Cover

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Series page, Title, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

This work began with two friendships. I met Michael Moffatt soon after I arrived at Rutgers in the mid-1970s. The faculty was still small enough, and faculty meetings still of enough consequence, that one often encountered colleagues outside one’s own discipline. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

I am particularly grateful for the help I have received from my undergraduate assistants from the Aresty Research Center, Alice Chunn, Caitlin Foley, Christa Hannon, Eric Knecht, Sarah Morrison, Rabeya Rahman, Jennifer Stice, and Erin Weinman, as well as graduate student Christina Chinas. ...

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1. Becoming a State University: The Presidencies of Robert Clothier, Lewis Webster Jones, and Mason Gross

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pp. 1-31

In 1945, at the end of World War II, “Rutgers” consisted of two small, elite, liberal arts colleges in New Brunswick, both still clinging to their status as private schools, plus some half-developed professional schools. As Rutgers approached its 250th anniversary in 2016, the university had become the state university, a research institution, and a member of the prestigious Association of American Universities. ...

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2. Rutgers Becomes a Research University: The Presidency of Edward J. Bloustein

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pp. 32-58

The almost two decade span from the presidency of Richard Nixon to that of Ronald Reagan reoriented American politics toward conservative social policies, market-driven solutions to economic problems, and fiscal belt-tightening at every level of government. Watergate, Iran-Contra, and innumerable lesser scandals aroused the electorate’s skepticism of public officials and injected a new nastiness into the already rough-and-tumble political order. ...

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3. Negotiating Excellence: The Presidencies of Francis L. Lawrence and Richard L. McCormick

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pp. 59-99

In 1989, in Beijing’s Tiananmen Square, China’s military crushed protesters demanding greater democracy. That same year, pro-democracy protests swept across Soviet-controlled eastern Europe; when Mikhail Gorbachev rejected a military response, the breakup of the Soviet empire began. ...

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4. Student Life

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pp. 100-137

Philip Roth enrolled in the Newark Colleges of Rutgers. As he recalls in his 1987 essay, “Joe College: Memories of a Fifties Education,” the gritty urban campus, where classes were held in a former brewery, was all that his family could afford, but he hoped that it might be a stepping stone to a law career. ...

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5. Residence Hall Architecture at Rutgers: Quadrangles, High-Rises, and the Changing Shape of Student Life

Carla Yanni

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pp. 138-163

Rutgers College students did not always live on campus—from the time of the signing of the charter in 1766 to the opening of the first dormitory, Winants Hall, in 1890, students lived in boarding houses, fraternities, or with their families. Between 1890 and World War II, Rutgers College encouraged students to live in dormitories to conform to the ideal of a closely knit collegiate atmosphere. ...

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6. Student Protest

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pp. 164-203

In 1959, Columbia Broadcasting ran a segment on its popular news program, The Twentieth Century, titled “Generation without a Cause,” which probed the malaise of American college students. Walter Cronkite informed the audience that this generation was called the “most baffling in our history”; after a brief recital by a montage of student voices of the sociological truism of the 1950s about conformity, the scene shifted to a typical American campus—Rutgers. ...

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7. Research at Rutgers

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pp. 204-254

Selman Waksman left the Ukraine, in tsarist Russia, for America shortly before World War I. Just twenty-one, with little English and little money, he pursued the advice of family members and made contact with a fellow Russian immigrant who worked at the New Jersey College of Agriculture. ...

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8. A Place Called Rutgers: Glee Club, Student Newspaper, Libraries, University Press, Art Galleries

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pp. 255-301

The definition of a university begins with its faculty and students. Not merely a product of the ubiquitous rankings, a school’s self-image depends on how well it is teaching its students and how productively its faculty members conduct their research (and, increasingly, how these two components of university life contribute to each other). ...

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9. Women’s Basketball

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pp. 302-311

In 1974, Rutgers hired Rita Kay Thomas to oversee women’s athletics in New Brunswick. Born in the Midwest and encouraged by her parents to pursue her athletic interests, she played three different styles of basketball, with three different set of rules during her college years (women’s, men’s, and international), and graduated with a degree in physical education. ...

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10. Athletic Policy

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pp. 312-349

After World War II, Rutgers ran its physical education program, including intercollegiate athletics, on a budget of approximately $100,000 year, mostly supplied by football revenues. Students at both Rutgers College and the New Jersey College for Women took a required physical education course. ...

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11. Epilogue

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pp. 350-354

In the halls of Old Queens, people recall vividly the arrival of Robert Barchi. He spotted a nineteenth-century tall-case clock. Decorative, but it had not worked for decades. Barchi loved clocks; he built them himself. He set to work on the Old Queens clock and soon had it doing what it was intended to do: keep time. ...

Notes

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pp. 355-370

Index

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pp. 371-418

About the Authors

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