Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-17

In his 1968 article on collective responsibility Joel Feinberg presents the following example: Suppose C and D plan a bank robbery, present their plan to a respected friend A, receive his encouragement, borrow weapons from B for their purpose, hire E as a getaway...

read more

2. Thomas Aquinas on Complicity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 18-30

This chapter and the next chapter contain in-depth treatments of two philosophical accounts of complicity, one by a historical figure and the other by a contemporary figure. The historical representative is Thomas Aquinas, and the contemporary representative is Christopher Kutz. In the Treatise on Justice...

read more

3. Christopher Kutz on Complicity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-44

Christopher Kutz published his impressive book, Complicity: Ethics and Law for a Collective Age, in 2000. It is the only book-length treatment of complicity currently available that is written from a philosophical perspective. In this chapter I will summarize his discussion and analyze some of his key...

read more

4. Enabling Harm

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 45-54

When one person enables another to do wrong, the person is almost certainly complicit in the wrongdoing of another, but I shall view the enabling of harm as a category of complicit behavior rather than a particular type of complicit behavior. Each of the nine ways enumerated by Thomas Aquinas...

read more

5. Facilitating Harm

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 55-65

The key characteristic of facilitating harm is that of making it more likely that another moral agent produces harm (Smith 1991, 158). For the sake of simplicity assume that the agent producing harm H is doing so intentionally and has decided to perform a particular action A as a means of bringing...

read more

6. Collective and Shared Responsibility

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-75

When two or more agents are responsible for the same state of affairs, they can be said to share responsibility for that state of affairs. When two or more agents belong to a collective which bears responsibility for a state of affairs, they can be said to be collectively responsible for the state of affairs. Both shared...

read more

7. Avoiding Complicity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 76-87

A moral agent who becomes complicit in the wrongdoing of another may well come to regret having attained this status. Such an agent may regret not having taken steps to avoid becoming complicit in this wrongdoing. Those who come to bear moral responsibility for the harm resulting from the wrongdoing...

read more

8. Moral Expectation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 88-101

The concept of moral expectation is one with which all of us are well acquainted. As children we learn that some actions are expected of us. Some things we are expected to do, and other things we are expected to refrain from doing. We learn that not doing what we are expected to do is morally wrong, and we learn...

read more

9. Well-Integrated Actions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 102-115

Fundamental to the notion of complicity, at least in the realm of law, is the fact that a moral agent cannot be his or her own accomplice. For complicity in wrongdoing to take place a principal agent and an accomplice must both be involved in a series of events leading to a harmful outcome, and they are of necessity...

read more

10. H. D. Lewis, Karl Jaspers, and Complicity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 116-128

The notion of being complicit in the wrongdoing of another is so familiar to the way we think about human interaction that we could scarcely imagine someone arguing that complicity in wrongdoing is not really possible in human life. We could scarcely imagine someone arguing that we are mistaken...

read more

11. Indirect Accomplices

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 129-141

Some people are inclined to take matters into their own hands, while other people have a propensity to let others take matters into their own hands and are content to act as accomplices. But still other people prefer a role even further removed from the wrongdoing of principal actors. These people find...

read more

12. Agreements and Complicity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-151

When one person is complicit in the wrongdoing of another person, an agreement of some sort is frequently in place between the two persons. Typically, the two persons enter freely and voluntarily into the agreement, with qualifications to be described presently, and each expects that the other person...

read more

13. Complicity in Criminal Law

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 152-159

Throughout this book I have referred many times to the list of accessory sins formulated by Thomas Aquinas. My belief is that this scheme provides a fruitful way of approaching the concept of complicity in wrongdoing, and I hope to have indicated its relevance to contemporary moral thinking...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-161

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 162-163

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 164