Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Introduction

Daniel Maudlin, Bernard L. Herman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-28

Building the British Atlantic World is an introduction to the ocean-going culture of the British Atlantic world as interpreted through its buildings, landscapes and settlements, exploring the extent, diversity, and sameness of the architecture built by the British overseas across their North Atlantic colonies. It explores...

Part I: Empire and Government

read more

1. To Build and Fortify: Defensive Architecture in the Early Atlantic Colonies

Emily Mann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-52

Royal charters that gave English adventurers sanction to settle in the Atlantic world from the late 1500s through the seventeenth century made provisions for defense a priority. To “inhabit and remain,” in the words of the Virginia Company’s charter of 1606, the colonists were authorized to “build and fortify.” The Avalon...

read more

2. Seats of Government: The Public Buildings of British America

Carl Lounsbury

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 53-77

Memory shaped the conceptual models of America’s early public buildings and the ceremonies associated with their functions. Many immigrant governors and mayors, magistrates and merchants, masons and carpenters could well recall the physical characteristics of English town halls, market houses, and shire...

read more

3. Landscapes of the New Republic at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello

Anna O. Marley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 78-100

In 1786 future United States presidents John Adams and Thomas Jefferson embarked together upon a summer tour through the great estates and gardens of England. John Adams recalled: “The gentlemen’s seats were the highest entertainment we met with. Stowe, Hagley, and Blenheim, are superb; Woburn, Caversham, and the Leasowes...

Part II: Religion and the Churches

read more

4. English Artisans’ Churches and North America: Traditions of Vernacular Classicism in the Eighteenth Century

Peter Guillery

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-118

The church of St. George, Portsea (Fig. 4.1), was built in 1753–54 by and for shipwrights and other artisans who worked in, and lived just outside, Portsmouth’s great naval dockyard, the single most important working hub of British sea power. Of this church, Nikolaus Pevsner, the German architectural historian who founded...

read more

5. The New England Meetinghouse: An Atlantic Perspective

Peter Benes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-141

The “Great Migration” of twenty thousand English Puritans to Massachusetts Bay, Connecticut, and New Haven between 1630 and 1640 put an immediate burden on builders of religious and civic structures in North America. The New England meetinghouse, an impermanent and multipurpose...

read more

6. The Praying Indian Towns: Encounter and Conversion through Imposed Urban Space

Alison Stanley

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 142-162

A key element in the New England missionary strategy for converting Native Americans to Christianity was the founding of “Praying Towns,” where converts could live together and be prepared for church membership by an English minister. Alternatively argued to be sites for the final destruction of traditional...

Part III: Commerce, Traffic, and Trade

read more

7. Tools of Empire: Trade, Slaves, and the British Forts of West Africa

Christopher DeCorse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-187

The British forts and trade posts of sub-Saharan West Africa afforded Britain the ability to control access to resources—including slaves—and laid the foundation for empire. Between the mid-seventeenth and late nineteenth centuries Britain or British companies established or occupied more than fifty forts...

read more

8. The Falmouth House and Store: The Social Landscapes of Caribbean Commerce in the Eighteenth Century

Louis P. Nelson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 188-211

Edward Barrett—the British sugar planter in Trelawney Parish, Jamaica, and the primary urban developer of Falmouth, that parish’s port town— died in 1799, leaving his town lots and his wharf to his son-in- law and grandson together with a substantial financial endowment. This inheritance built a grand house...

read more

9. Building British Atlantic Port Cities: Bristol and Liverpool in the Eighteenth Century

Kenneth Morgan

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 212-228

The growth of port cities was an essential component of building the eighteenth-century British Atlantic world as British overseas trade became “Americanized” in the volume and value of goods traded across the Atlantic.1 Such urban centers flourished with the growth of oceanic shipping lanes and the activities...

Part IV: Houses and the Home

read more

10. Building Status in the British Atlantic World: The Gentleman’s House in the English West Country and Pennsylvania

Stephen Hague

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 231-252

In the mid-1680s, young John Elbridge set off from the Massachusetts Bay Colony bound for England. John’s family hailed from the port of Bristol, but some years previously his father had taken them to the Pemaquid settlement in the modern-day state of Maine and then, in the aftermath of King...

read more

11. Parlor and Kitchen in the Borderlands of the Urban British American Atlantic World, 1670–1720

Bernard L. Herman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 253-268

Borderlands map edge and threshold. They are locations of indeterminacy, performance, conflict, and uneasy negotiation. Borders are never resolved and always policed in some fashion. Borders are places of exchange where identities are questioned and passage regulated. In some instances, borderlands are discovered...

read more

12. Palladianism and the Villa Ideal in South Carolina: The Transatlantic Perils of Classical Purity

Lee Morrissey

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-289

Built between 1738 and 1742, Drayton Hall, outside Charleston, South Carolina, is an ideal subject for a book on the architecture of the British Atlantic world, as it illustrates tensions inherent in the transatlantic approach to early modern American and British history. The house was built for an English family who...

read more

13. Politics and Place-Making on the Edge of Empire: Loyalists, Highlanders, and the Early Farmhouses of British Canada

Daniel Maudlin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 290-312

This final chapter is concerned with place-making in the maritime landscape of Nova Scotia through the very human activities of housebuilding and homemaking. In the eighteenth century, Nova Scotia was a heavily forested peninsula surrounded by the North Atlantic Ocean on the northern edge of the British Empire...

Selected Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 313-318

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 319-324

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 325-340

Series Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-342