Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-4

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 5-6

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 7-14

On 30 November 2014, there was unveiled on the south bank of the Thames a bronze statue of Ada Salter, humanitarian, social worker and politician. She took her place on the London waterfront alongside statues of her husband, Alfred, who felt he had lived too long, and their daughter, Joyce, whose life had tragically...

read more

1. The Twin Movements

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-30

Ada was born into a well-to-do Methodist farming family, in Raunds in Northamptonshire, in 1866. Her mother Sarah Brown, whose maiden name was Ekins (an ancient name in Raunds), was descended from a renowned Methodist family, one line of which could be traced back to Charles Wesley himself. Sarah and Samuel Brown...

read more

2. The Sisters of the People

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 31-46

The Sisters of the People, which Ada now joined, had arisen out of an encounter between Katherine Barrett, a precocious teenager of liberal views, and Hugh Price Hughes, a highly conservative young man training to be a minister. Katherine had acquired the notion that many Christians...

read more

3. The Bermondsey Settlement

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-69

Methodist preacher John Scott Lidgett had set up the Bermondsey Settlement following a moment of sudden revelation. One night in 1887, he wrote, walking back home from the small village of Quy in Cambridgeshire, ‘under a moonlit, but stormy sky, I vowed to God...

read more

4. The Break with the Liberals

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 70-80

In June 1900 Ada and Alfred officially ceased residence at Bermondsey Settlement. Ada continued her social work there for many years, but, like the West London Mission, it was declining; its best years were behind it. Indeed, by the end of 1900 the Settlement was wracked by new financial...

read more

5. Ada Makes History

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-99

Ada’s break with the Liberals was not simply despair. There had already opened up an alternative channel for her political energies. Around the time of the Gribble march in May 1905 she became friendly with Margaret MacDonald, wife of James Ramsay MacDonald, the future...

read more

6. Personal Tragedy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 100-106

If 1909 had been one of the best years in Ada’s life, then 1910 turned out to be the worst. In just a few months her fortunes swung from sky-high to rock-bottom, and her mood from happiness to misery. In January, there was another general election, because of the political crisis precipitated...

read more

7. The Women’s Labour League

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-137

When, after some months, Ada and Alfred re-engaged with politics they took quite separate paths. Alfred concentrated locally on the Bermondsey Labour Party while Ada concentrated nationally on the Women’s Labour League, often taking on speaking engagements...

read more

8. The World War

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 138-171

Ada did not mention war in her conference speech of 1914 but in July, the Balkans flared up again and suddenly Austria was on the edge of war with Serbia, Germany with Russia, and France with Germany. By the beginning of August Britain’s entry into the war was probably...

read more

9. The Bermondsey Revolution

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 172-223

In the immediate wake of the war, the chances of Ada and Alfred winning any sort of election seemed remote. Those who had opposed the war were at fi rst deeply unpopular. In November 1918 Lloyd-George took full advantage of this by calling a snap general election before...

read more

10. Ada Triumphant

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 224-256

From 1922 on Ada became increasingly conscious of the restrictions that the London County Council imposed on Bermondsey. The LCC could not only block slum-clearance but also beautification ideas, such as facilities for an open-air swimming pool or for gymnastics. Clearly...

read more

11. Death and Despair

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 257-267

Brockway says that the outbreak of war in September 1939 threw Alfred, for the first time in his life, into ‘utter despair’. He had not believed war would come ‘until the very last moment … the realisation that he had failed crushed his mind and spirit as well’. The decision...

read more

12. The New World

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 268-280

After 1945 the old ILP was forgotten, and the role of ethical socialism was set aside, as if they had never been. A ‘brave new world’ was born, driven by technology and regulated by a top-down state. The technology, it seemed, delivered prosperity and full employment. The state, after...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 281

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 282-293

Index of Persons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 294-298