Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Introduction: From Roses to Neuroses

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pp. 1-22

Early in the thirteenth century, a monk in Assisi, Italy, tried to quell his lust through a severe self-mortification of the flesh. Tormented by desire, he ran out into the snowy winter night and threw himself into a wild rose bush, whose thorns cured him of his passion. Then, miraculously, despite the cold, the roses began...

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1. Conversion, Suffering, and Publicity

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pp. 23-54

What did it mean for a congregational minister in New England to write of his desire to be “emptied and annihilated; to lie in the dust, and to be full of Christ alone”?1 This famous passage from Jonathan Edwards’s “Personal Narrative” (c. 1739) offers a fruitful point of departure for tracing the connections between...

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2. Indian Abjection in the Public Sphere

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pp. 55-83

In January 1836, William Apess, a Pequot, adopted Mashpee, and former Methodist preacher, twice delivered his “Eulogy on King Philip” at the Odeon, a luxurious Boston lecture hall that was a short distance from the Brattle Street Congregational Church where Jonathan Edwards gave his first recorded...

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3. The Martyrology of White Abolitionists

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pp. 84-117

In 1845, the hand of a white ship captain, Jonathan Walker, became what might seem like an unlikely icon of abolition. Branded “SS” for “slave stealer” by a U.S. marshal in Florida, Walker’s hand was daguerreotyped, engraved, woodcut, and printed on thousands of broadsides. Abolitionist newspapers and antislavery...

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4. Masochism, Minstrelsy, and Liberal Revolution

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pp. 118-145

Why did nineteenth-century masochists name Uncle Tom’s Cabin as a point of departure for their fantasy? Germinal accounts of masochism in the exchanges between sexologist Richard von Krafft-Ebing and his patientcorrespondents offer a potent image of solitary childhood novel reading.1 Freud located...

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Epilogue: Child Pets, Melville’s Pip, and Oriental Blackness

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pp. 146-164

While much work on abjection, race, eroticism, and suffering is centered on a scopic, visual model of sensibility and sentiment, this visual model, as Chapter 1 describes, is premised on a broader sensitization of bodies in and through suffering. Thus far, this book has considered two competing but complementary tendencies...

Notes

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pp. 165-218

Index

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pp. 219-230

Acknowledgments

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pp. 231-232