Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This project would not have been possible without the interest and encouragement of numerous individuals. I am grateful to Alan Nadel for his enthusiasm and unwavering support of this manuscript from its beginning and for providing me an excellent model of professionalism, collegiality, and intellectual...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-7

In 1925 the Howard University professor Alain Locke edited an ambitious anthology entitled The New Negro. Building on the March 1925 “Harlem number” of Survey Graphic, which emphasized the significance of New York City as an African American cultural center for blacks, Locke’s New Negro included historical...

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1. The New Negro Genealogy

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pp. 8-34

As early as 1745 an anonymous eighteenth-century writer contributing to the London Magazine noted that the phrase New Negro was used by black slaves in America to describe slaves who were newly arrived from Africa.1 Although this reference is an isolated one, it highlights an early transformation...

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2. Nashville. A Southern Black Metropolis

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pp. 35-54

If the New Negro is a figure of resistance, it was resistance, as the histories of lynching and Jim Crow have made clear, to very formidable forces. No matter what the inclination of southern African Americans—and until a few decades into the twentieth century most African Americans were...

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3. Soul Searching. W.E.B. DuBois in the "South of Slavery"

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pp. 55-78

William Edward Burghardt Du Bois epitomized the qualities that would come to be called the New Negro, and the fact that some of his major work antedates the consolidation of that concept is evidence that his work was as influential as it was prescient. He was born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts...

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4. "Mightier than the Sword": The New Negro Novels of Sutton E. Griggs

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pp. 79-113

In Sutton Elbert Griggs’s novel The Hindered Hand (1905), a young African American boy named Henry Crump stands before a judge in an Almaville, Tennessee, courtroom.1 He has been tried and found guilty of assault for throwing rocks at a group of white boys who had also thrown rocks...

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5. "Tried by Fire". The African American Boycott of Jim Crow Streetcars in Nashville, 1905-1907

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pp. 114-133

On August 27, 1905, sixteen African American men entered the downtown office of the county clerk in Nashville’s Court House. Among the group were influential businessmen, politicians, and religious leaders from the city’s African American community. The purpose of their visit was to file a charter of incorporation...

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6. "Before I'd Be a Slave": The Fisk University Protests, 1924-1925

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pp. 134-175

W. E. B. Du Bois arrived in Nashville on June 2, 1924, to deliver the Fisk University commencement address before students, faculty, alumni, and members of the administration. It was not the first time he had been given such an honor, having delivered a commencement address in 1898 and participated...

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Epilogue

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pp. 176-180

The concept of the New Negro has now become as archaic as the word Negro itself, so much so that we may be in danger of losing sight of its historical importance. If this study has added some understanding to the origins of the New Negro, it is also important to note the legacy of that figure in its...

Notes

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pp. 181-218

Index

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pp. 219-226

About the Author

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p. 227