Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vii

Acknowledgments

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p. ix

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Introduction

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pp. 1-9

We generally communicate with each other by using words, but communication is impossible if we do not all understand and agree about what the words actually mean. It’s not just a question of translating from one language to another; even though we are fluent in our mother tongue, we still need occasionally...

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1. Christianity’s Unified First Millennium (until ca. 1054)

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pp. 10-45

In the first centuries of the church, the early Christians certainly never envisioned the existence of an established procedure to canonize martyrs as saints for the universal church, and anyone who expects to find such a system in early church history will search in vain. The Christian faithful could not have deliberately planned...

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2. Russian Orthodoxy from the Conversion of Rus’ (ca. 988) to Today

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pp. 46-99

Traditionally, the conversion of Rus’ to Christianity is believed to have occurred in or about 988, under Prince Vladimir, who (at least according to the account found in the chronicles) chose to embrace the liturgy and customs of Byzantium over those of the Latins. The Russians’ knowledge of the basic teachings of the faith...

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3. The Catholic Church, from the Great Schism (ca. 1054) to Today

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pp. 100-144

Russia has spent over a thousand years embracing, then developing, and eventually refining its understanding of the traditional Christian concepts of martyrdom and the canonization of saints. Given the great age of the church in Russia, it has obviously been afforded a tremendous amount of time to hone...

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4. Comparisons and Conclusions

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pp. 145-162

We have now traced the development of the process employed for canonizing martyrs over a period of nearly two thousand years, and we’ve taken the investigation in two geographical directions— eastward, to Russia, and westward, to the Catholic Church. It’s quite obvious that while there are many evident...

Abbreviations

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pp. 163-164

Notes

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pp. 165-188

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 189-196

Index

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pp. 197-200