Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Editors' Preface

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pp. vii-viii

In recent decades, a great deal of attention has been devoted to ending conflicts in societies through various methods of reconciliation. World War II ended with a victor’s peace that included occupation and criminal tribunals in both the former Nazi Germany and the Empire...

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

When does a revolutionary war end? When the guns are silent? When the peacemakers have finished their labors? When fundamental change has run its course? When a rule of law replaces a rule of violence? When a new order of law and governance is established? All...

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Introduction: Of Hamilton and a Brewhouse

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pp. 1-6

Sometime in the last days of winter 1784, twenty-nine-year-old attorney Alexander Hamilton surely stopped to contemplate the ruins of the Rutgers family brewhouse on Maiden Lane, between William Street and Pearl Street in Lower Manhattan. Romantically crafted classical...

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1. The First American Civil War

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pp. 7-23

In 1765, New York City was the second largest city on the British North American mainland. Its upwards of 16,000 men, women, and children occupied a patchwork of wards. Some of these neighborhoods featured streets of townhouses, the urban mansions of the day...

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2. Laws and Lawyers for a Revolutionary Republic

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pp. 24-42

Before the onset of hostilities, New York City was the capital of the colony. Dominated by moderate Whigs and Loyalists, the colonial assembly had refused to send representatives to the Second Continental Congress. More insistent was the Committee of Sixty...

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3. Rutgers v. Waddington in the Mayor's Court

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pp. 43-72

If any legal institution could claim to represent the many strands of people and events in New York City’s history from the founding of the city to 1784, it was the Mayor’s Court. Created first by the Dutch in New Amsterdam as the court of schout, burgomeister...

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4. "A Cause of National Significance"

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pp. 73-94

On June 29, oral argument in Rutgers v. Waddington began and ended, and counsel deposited written briefs with the court. Duane recognized from the start how important the case, hence his opinion, would be. He might have rested with the decision on the case...

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5. The Many Legacies of Rutgers

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pp. 95-124

On its face, Rutgers v. Waddington concerned three British merchants and a Patriot family. But Duane’s opinion went far beyond the claims and counterclaims of the parties. In the course of rescuing the British merchants from what in other judicial hands might have been total...

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Epilogue: Rutgers v. Waddington and the Second American Civil War

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pp. 125-130

Civil wars are bloodthirsty affairs. From the ancient Roman civil wars through the English civil wars of the 1640s historical records amply demonstrate the winners’ unkindness to the losers after open hostilities ended. But the civil war at the heart of the American Revolution...

Chronology

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pp. 131-132

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Bibliographical Essay

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pp. 133-146

This bibliography includes the sources consulted for present volume along with very brief sketches of some of the modern controversy surrounding the case. It is not intended to be comprehensive, but will point the reader in the direction of additional materials...

Index

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pp. 147-152

Back Cover

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