Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xii

This book tells the story of the meeting of two remarkable individuals, Maria Montessori and Samuel Sidney (S. S.) McClure, in the second decade of the twentieth century. Maria Montessori (1870–1952) is acclaimed internationally as one of history’s great pioneering educators. Montessori schools...

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1. S. S. McClure: Cyclone in a Frock Coat

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pp. 1-27

The personalities of S. S. McClure, editor and publisher, and Maria Montessori, physician and educator, made them the most unlikely of associates. Their short transatlantic alliance was both energized and flawed by their distinctive traits of character. The McClure-Montessori relationship, from 1910 to 1915...

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2. Maria Montessori: “An Educational Wonder-Worker”

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pp. 28-40

Who was Maria Montessori and what did Americans know about her in the early twentieth century? At the time of her relationship with S. S. McClure from 1910– 1915, biographical information about Montessori, in English, came to America in cameo pieces...

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3. The Montessori Method

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pp. 41-56

When S. S. McClure decided to popularize Montessori education in the United States, his strategy was two pronged. He needed to introduce the great Italian educator, Maria Montessori, and her unique method of education. There were those, like Mabel Bell, who would come to prefer the method...

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4. Creating a Favorable Climate of Opinion for the Montessori Method in the United States

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pp. 57-76

By 1909, Montessori was recognized as an educational innovator in Europe while in the United States her work was not yet widely known. The four years between 1909 and 1913 were important in introducing Montessori to Americans and in creating a favorable climate of opinion for the Montessori Method. Used...

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5. McClure’s Magazine Publicizes Montessori

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pp. 77-108

Samuel S. McClure used his magazine to become Maria Montessori’s leading publicist and promoter in the United States. Although he had lost financial control of the magazine he had founded, McClure, still editor of McClure’s Magazine, mounted a concerted publicity campaign to promote Montessori education...

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6. McClure and the Montessori Educational Association

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pp. 109-120

The introduction and promotion of Montessori education in the United States, from 1910 through 1915 was first done by individuals such as S. S. McClure, Anne George, Dorothy Canfield Fisher, and Alexander Graham and, his wife, Mabel (Hubbard) Bell, and then by committees and organizations. The well-connected...

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7. Montessori’s American Lecture Tour, December 1913

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pp. 121-149

While McClure was crossing the Atlantic with Montessori, Lee Keedick, the lecture agent, was making arrangements for their arrival and for Montessori’s speaking tour. Mrs. Bell and the Montessori Educational Association, too, were planning for Montessori’s visit to the United States. To ensure maximum...

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8. The Montessori-McClure Breakup

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pp. 150-185

A mutually beneficial professional relationship between S. S. McClure and Maria Montessori was based on the American editor’s discovery of the remarkable Italian educator in 1910 followed by his subsequent publicity about her work in McClure’s Magazine in 1911 and 1912. By April...

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9. Montessori Education in the United States Post-McClure

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pp. 186-211

As S. S. McClure and Maria Montessori’s relationship reached its unhappy conclusion in the spring of 1914, both the publisher and the pedagogue were angry about the events leading to its unsatisfactory termination. They each had their personal interpretations of these events from their own perspectives...

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10. McClure and Montessori: The Later Years

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pp. 212-222

After their relationship ended in 1914, McClure, who died in 1949 at the age of 92, lived for another thirty-five years. Montessori, who died in 1952, lived for thirty-eight years after she last saw McClure. The more than three decades since their last meeting took them down different paths...

Notes

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pp. 223-250

Bibliography

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pp. 251-256

Index

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pp. 257-267