Cover

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Frontmatter

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REEDUCATING THE EDUCATOR

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword by Sigrun Gudmundsdottir

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pp. ix-xii

Everyone who has contributed to this volume is an accomplished writer and established scholar in the field of teacher education. In the book the authors open up an unexamined part of the teacher education enterprise; the teacher educators themselves and the graduate programs that socialize them into what they are and how they think. We have previ-...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

What began as a project became a book largely because of a lot of work “behind the scenes.” We want to thank colleagues and friends at both of our institutions for supporting us throughout. We thank the administration at the Central Institute of English and Foreign Languages (India) and the Faculty of Education, University of Regina (Canada) for mak-...

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Introduction

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pp. xv-xviii

The idea for editing and contributing to a book on community building in teacher education grew out of long discussions between the two editors when Helen was among the resource persons invited to participate in an International Seminar on English Language Teaching, at the Central Institute of English and Foreign Languages (Rama’s institution) in...

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Part I: OPENING THE CONVERSATION

Part One, as its title indicates, opens the conversation. To a large extent this part of the book is about individual efforts to build community, although the first chapter is slightly different because the editors thought it was important to place a few ideas “on the table” right at the beginning. And so chapter 1 focuses on the changing role of the...

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1. Community and Community Building in Teacher Education

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pp. 3-17

The intention of this chapter is to open the conversation about community and community building in teacher education. Here we play two roles as members of the book “community.” First, as editors we discuss, albeit briefly, the three interconnected “c’s” of climate, community, and change. Second, we author our own stories of community as lived in each of our institutions. We begin with a brief examination...

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2. Finding New Words for Old Songs: Creating Relationships and Community in Teacher Education

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pp. 18-38

Solzhenitsyn’s advice serves to introduce an account of one teacher educator’s efforts to research her own practice and professional development over time, and to focus on the role that relationships and community have played in that development. The journey described here is a reflective one whose purpose it is to give an account of my professional development during my first seven years as a teacher educa-...

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3. Enhancing First-Time Teaching at the Postsecondary Level: A Story of Collaborative Mentorship

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pp. 39-52

The concept of mentoring is an ancient one dating back to early Greek civilization. In Homer’s Odyssey, Odysseus appointed Mentor toguide, protect, and educate his son during his absence. Although thereis no single definition of a mentor, it is generally agreed that mentors are persons with relevant experience who are willing to share their knowledge and model their skills. Furthermore, effective mentors provide...

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Part II: FOCUS ON PARADIGMS

In Part Two our exploration of individuals building community continues as contributors use different paradigmatic lenses in order to describe the process, tell their stories, and step back from them to reflect. Chapter 4 presents a dynamic view of the concept of community in the posttraditional era, as Lorraine Ling and her colleagues suggest that in...

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4. The Posttraditional Community: A New Concept for a New Era

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pp. 55-70

Our opening citation captures some of the sense of fragmentation, discontinuity, and disempowerment that is facing groups and individuals as we enter a new globalized millennium. We perceive a rise of new social movements and social discourses, and a decentering of the human subject, linked with a stretching of time and space. In the posttraditional era some sense of community is perhaps more necessary than in previous eras but it will not be a sense of belonging...

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5. From “Common Grounds” to the “Rough Ground” of Teacher Education: Experiencing Teacher Education as a Collaborative Practice

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pp. 71-90

Teacher education has been dominated in the past by a technical rational orientation that presumes that effective teaching involves the application of technique to the problems of practice. With the more recentmove to reconceptualizing teaching and teacher education within a reflective practice orientation, teacher educator practice needs to be ques-...

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6. Situating Ourselves within Narrative: Reeducating the Educator

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pp. 91-106

There is a responsive, reciprocal relationship between narrative inquiry and community building. Narrative inquiry engenders community; community nurtures narrative inquiry. This statement is rooted in our lived experiences as five graduate students in the Centre forTeacher Development at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto (OISE/UT). Here we were introduced to narra-...

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7. The Postmodern Challenge: Using Arts-Based Inquiry to Build a Community of Teacher Collaborators and Selves by Carol A. Mullen and C. T. Patrick Diamond

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pp. 107-124

In this chapter we, Carol and Pat, explore postmodern forms of inquiry and their role in teacher education and community development. We use images of change and combination to capture our sense of postmodernism and to describe how a new generation of researchers is experimenting together as teacher-artist collaborators. We offer arts-based inquiry as a postmodern way of developing innovative forms of...

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Part III: FOCUS ON PROGRAMS

Part Three focuses on community building through new programs. Chapter 8 is a description of ways in which communities of learners are created online within the context of a graduate course in leadership. Ann Nevin, Antonette Hood, and Mary McNeil, professors from three American universities, argue that the Internet is changing the way in which community members communicate with...

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8. Creating Community in Online (Electronic) Environments

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pp. 127-150

Teacher education has a history of being influenced by a variety of disciplines. Social and psychological theories of human development influence the pedagogical practices in both the university and the publicschool classroom. For example, Deutsche (1949), a social psychologist, first reported a theory of cooperation and competition based on Lenin’s...

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9. Building Communities in Teacher Education: The M.Teach Experience

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pp. 151-168

Currently, teaching as a profession has a problematic status in Australia. Many teachers have reported an ambivalence about their profession, and a number are, in fact, quite negative about their capacity to cope adequately with the increasing demands of the community (Kelly 1995). Some beginning teachers have even reported a high degreeof cynicism from the teachers who supervise their work, which has in-...

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10. Project Partnerships: An Account of Partnership-Based Teacher Education at Victoria University

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pp. 169-184

The School of Education at Victoria University of Technology offers programs in education, youth studies, and computer-mediated art.The university is community focused and located on fifteen campusesin Melbourne’s western region, a large metropolitan area where issues of equity, social justice, cultural diversity, and disadvantage dominate. More than 50,000 students and 3,000 teaching staff from ninety nation-...

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11. Creating a Community of Teacher Educators

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pp. 185-198

The notion of the importance of teachers working in communities is gaining ground in the literature on teaching and teacher education (McLaughlin 1994; Rosenholtz 1989b; Talbert and McLaughlin 1994). Replacing the myth or reality of “the lonely teacher” is a growing belief in restructuring teachers’ work so that teachers will be able to work together, learn from each other, and continue their professional...

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Part IV: CLOSING THE CONVERSATION

Part Four contains a single chapter written by the editors. The primary themes running through the various chapters. This leads to a discussion of being in relationship, teacher education and change, and teacher educator reflective practice. The chapter concludes with a few thoughts on...

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12. Gathering the Threads

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pp. 201-206

As we read the different stories of community building in teacher education, we noticed a number of threads weaving their way through the fabric of the chapters. These are narratives of practice (cf.,Clandinin and Connelly; Connelly and Clandinin) that explore the ways in which teacher educators live in the world. These narratives have a strong sense of relation and caring, and commitment to teacher...

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Epilogue

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pp. 207-208

The stories told by contributors to this book suggest there are a lot of similarities from one teacher education faculty to another. They tell of the attempts of teacher educators as individuals and as faculty members to form communities of many different kinds and with many different purposes. The stories speak of reaching out beyond the uni-versity to teacher colleagues in schools, and to the broader community—the public whose interests teachers and teacher educators...

References

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pp. 209-228

About the Contributors

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pp. 229-234

Index

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pp. 235-242