Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

This book has evolved over the course of several years with countless contributions from mentors, colleagues, archivists and librarians, and friends and family who, directly or indirectly, lent their generous support. I would like to express my immense gratitude to one and all for being there and...

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Notes on Names, Pronunciation, and Sources

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pp. xi-xiv

In Turkey last names were introduced only after 1934 as part of republican reforms, designed, among other things, to keep more accurate records on the population. Although this book covers events that started prior to the adoption of last names, I have chosen to refer to all characters with their...

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Introduction: Ambivalences and Anxieties

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pp. 1-14

The Turkish History Exhibition was inaugurated by Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the founder and first president of the Republic of Turkey, on October 20, 1937, at the Dolmabahçe Palace in Istanbul.¹ His larger-than-life green marble bust greeted visitors at the entrance, positioned...

Part I. Forging a New Identity

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1. Political Capital

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pp. 17-52

Indeed the founding fathers of the republic considered building a new capital in Ankara to be integral to their twin goals of modernizing the country and forging a new political order. They fervently believed that producing a new built environment that physically and metaphorically...

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2. Theaters of Diplomacy

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pp. 53-78

After relocating the capital, the Kemalists hoped that, like the state’s own bureaucracy, the corps diplomatique would also follow them from Istanbul to Ankara. Much to their disappointment, however, this did not turn out to be the case. Foreign missions were unwilling to...

Part II. Erasures in the Land

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3. Dismantling the Landscapes of Islam

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pp. 81-113

In late December 1919, after more than seven months of touring Anatolia and attending organizational meetings, the nationalists finally arrived in Ankara on an icy cold morning, where they were greeted by cheering crowds who had gathered just outside town at the Dikmen Hills to...

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4. Of Forgotten People and Forgotten Places

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pp. 114-154

Between the last Ottoman census and the first republican census, the population of the territory that today corresponds to Turkey changed dramatically: whereas in 1914 one in every five people who lived in Turkey was non-Muslim, in 1927, only one in forty was...

Part III. An Imaginable Community

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5. Nationalizing Space

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pp. 157-196

In her renowned memoirs of the Turkish War of Independence (1919–1922), Halide Edip (Adıvar) wrote extensively about the difficulty of mustering support to fight the war even in Ankara, where the nationalists had based themselves. In a conversation during the buildup to the war...

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6. Manufacturing Turkish Citizens

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pp. 197-236

Modern nationality is a spatial concept, much in the way that the nation-state is territorial. The spatiality of national affiliation goes beyond the “willingness to die for a specific piece of land” or claim to self-rule over that land—although it includes those...

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Epilogue

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pp. 237-244

There is a certain poignancy about finalizing a book on the making of the modern Turkish nation-state just as the very premises of that state, its fundamental symbols, and the ties that bind its polity together have become subjects of intense contention. What triggered...

Notes

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pp. 245-290

Bibliography

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pp. 291-320

Index

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pp. 321-330

Back Cover

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