Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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About the Contributors

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction. Present Tension in Future Tenses: Re-writing Africa into the Twenty-first Century

Gbemisola Adeoti

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pp. 1-14

The tale of Africa’s march through the labyrinth of history is long and multilayered. If can, however be aptly summarised through the framework of paradox and irony. From ancient times to the period of slavery and colonialism to the present era of neo-colonialism, the continent and its people are defined by simultaneous visibility and absence, excitement and neglect, power and powerlessness. Did the...

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1. Orality, Modernity and African Development: Myth as Dialogue of Civilisations

Inyani Simala

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pp. 15-32

The desire to understand pressing issues such as modernity and development is not made any easier by competing and different knowledge domains. None of these domains offers a single and comprehensive answer to what is happening around us. Thus, my concern in this chapter is to discuss the various ways in which orality provides an indispensable, eternally-expanding guide to...

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2. Requiem for Absolutism: Soyinka and the Re-visioning of Governance in Twenty-first Century Africa

Gbemisola Adeoti

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pp. 33-48

This chapter examines Wole Soyinka’s notion and vision of governance in contemporary Africa as articulated through his dramaturgy. Over the years, Soyinka has remained an outstanding public intellectual and a committed writer whose philosophical reflections on the African world in the postcolonial era resonate across disciplines. In his creative oeuvre (plays, novels, poems, essays, films...

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3. A Critical Discourse Evaluation of Decolonisation and Democratisation: Issues in Africa as Exemplified in Soyinka’s Non-fictional Texts

Henry Hunjo

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pp. 49-58

Africans deserve quality of life. By this we mean what is generally referred to as good living conditions, where social provisions that make human beings enjoy existence are available in adequate supply. These provisions and their constant supply have been seen to be the responsibility of governments of African states. Africa, therefore, deserves leaders whose goals must necessarily include the...

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4. Power, Artistic Agency and Poetic Discourse: Poetry as Cultural Critique in Africa

Sule E. Egya

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pp. 59-76

Without doubt, literature, especially imaginative writing, played a vital role in the struggles that gave rise to the wave of independence in the 1960s in Africa. Those often regarded as the first generation of African poets in European languages (Léopold Sédar Senghor, Wole Soyinka, Christopher Okigbo, David Diop, Birago Diop and Okot p’Bitek) approached imaginative writing in the 1950s...

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5. African Literature and the Anxiety of Being in the Twenty-first Century

Stephen Ogundipe

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pp. 77-88

Much attention has been paid to the legacies of African literature in the Twentieth century articulating the overarching social-economic, political and cultural rupture on the continent. Unique moments in the historical trajectory of African literature and the distinctive marks made by generations of African writers have also been captured in various critical works. The general opinion is that the first...

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6. A Critical Analysis of Prophetic Myths in the Selected Fiction of Ben Okri

Olusola Ogunbayo

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pp. 89-104

In the search for a panacea to Africa’s socio-political and economic malaise, scholars from various intellectual backgrounds, including literary critics, have offered perceptive solutions. For instance, critics have studied the writing of Ben Okri, the renowned Nigerian novelist, as a template. Mathew Green, in his study of A Way of Being Free and Mental Fight (Romanticism 2008), argues...

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