Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Maps

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p. ix

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Introduction. Many Faces of Constantine

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pp. 1-24

Within two years of Constantine’s death in 337, Eusebius of Caesarea put the finishing touches on his Life of the Blessed Emperor Constantine, the single best source we have for understanding this pivotal ruler.1 Eusebius was perhaps...

Part I. Constantine’s Self-Presentation

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Chapter 1. Constantine Develops

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pp. 27-47

We are fortunate to possess as many of Constantine’s writings as we do. While all are highly mannered and each crafted to the exigencies of individual audiences, they offer at least some understanding of how the emperor constructed his own...

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Chapter 2. Constantinian Constants

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pp. 48-66

In the previous chapter, we examined Constantine as a figure in a continuous state of self-refashioning. He made and remade his image to suit changing circumstances, to adapt to chance occurrences, and to respond to political and military...

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Chapter 3. Constantine and the Christians: Controlling the Message

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pp. 67-84

An emperor modulated his message not only to suit the advance of time and shifts in circumstance, but also with an eye to his audience. Many of the changes we witnessed in Constantine’s self-presentation in Chapter 1 were traced using that group...

Part II. the Power of Petitions

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Chapter 4. Approaching Constantine: The Orcistus Dossier

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pp. 87-113

It has long been agreed that Roman government tended to implement policy in response to problems and petitions rather than working in preplanned and proactive ways. With his foundational work on the Roman emperor...

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Chapter 5. The Exigencies of Dialogue: Hispellum

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pp. 114-130

In contrast with Phrygia, where a patchwork of exclusive religious communities—some Christian, others pagan—coexisted alongside, but also in tension with one another, central Italy in the early fourth century was much more religiously...

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Chapter 6. Constantine’s Cities in the West: Nomen Venerandum

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pp. 131-149

In the fourth chapter we saw that a politics of civic favoritism was operative under Constantine. He split tiny Orcistus from its much larger neighbor Nacoleia and endowed it with civic status in no small part because of its adherence...

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Chapter 7. Constantine’s Cities in the East: Peer Polity Interaction

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pp. 150-164

Civic politics in the East operated according to slightly different norms than in the West. To be sure, rivalries between neighboring polities arose in both places, and these were often mediated through the emperor. But in contrast with most...

Part III. Reconstructing the Ancient City

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Chapter 8. Redistributing Wealth

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pp. 167-178

The ancient city was a complicated financial undertaking. Cities were at once property owners and revenue-producing entities. In the former capacity they owned both real and movable wealth, including considerable amounts of...

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Chapter 9. Building Churches

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pp. 179-196

Ancient cities took great pride in their temples, not just as cultic centers but also as architectural showpieces. In this sense, the identity of any given polity was intimately intertwined with the size and beauty of its sanctuaries. It is thus...

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Chapter 10. Empowering Bishops

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pp. 197-206

At the same time that Constantine was redirecting landed and movable property from cities and temples to Christian churches and building Christian architecture into the urban infrastructure of cities, he was also working to transfer power...

Part IV. Alternative Responses to Constantine

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Chapter 11. Engaging Cities

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pp. 209-229

An emperor’s relationship with his people was always discursive. To be sure, he generally had the upper hand in any dialogue, for by virtue of his vast administrative, military, and symbolic power, he could control access to governmental...

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Chapter 12. Resisting Cities

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pp. 230-245

Religious violence has come into its own as a field of study. Recent work on the question in Late Antiquity has made great strides in detaching violence from the realm of the aberrant and resituating it into the range of the normal. Violence...

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Chapter 13. Opposing Christians: Donatists and Caecilianists

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pp. 246-259

Resistance to Constantine’s religious agenda did not arise from pagans alone. Constantine had only barely announced his conversion publicly when he became aware of dissent in the Christian community of North Africa. Probably in...

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Chapter 14. Complex Cities: Antioch and Alexandria

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pp. 260-278

In numerous instances in Chapters 4 through 7, we have seen how Constantine was able to exploit interurban rivalries in order to impose aspects of his religious agenda at the local and regional levels. Orcistus and Nacoleia, Hispellum...

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Epilogue

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pp. 279-284

When the magnificent chapel of Saint Sylvester was consecrated beside the church of the Santi Quattro Coronati in Rome in 1247, Pope Innocent IV was living in exile in Lyon because of fears he would be set upon by Frederick II, the Holy...

List of Sigla and Abbreviations

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pp. 285-288

Notes

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pp. 289-356

Bibliography

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pp. 357-392

Index

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pp. 393-402

Acknowledgments

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pp. 403-404