Cover

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p. 1

Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Th is book was supported by my graduate work in Georgetown University’s History Department and by grants from Georgetown’s Graduate School and Oberlin College. Its production would not have been possible without the invaluable and precious support of many colleagues and friends in the United...

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Introduction: Imagined Empires, Real Rebels

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pp. 1-16

Empire is almighty. It is an all-encompassing political entity capable of penetrating places big and small, near and far, and establishing full hegemony. The semidivine omnipotence of empire is made manifest not only in its ability to control the high politics of the metropolis but also in its penetration...

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1. Ottomans, Plague, and Rebellion (1500–1800)

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pp. 17-42

In the 1760s, the Ottoman sultan received a report on the state of aff airs in Egypt that revealed unpleasant news. Egypt, one of the shiniest jewels in the empire’s crown, was not one intact province under the sultan’s full hegemony. The eminent officer who compiled the report described the existence of an...

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2. The French, Plague Encore, and Jihad (1798–1801)

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pp. 43-69

In 1798, when Napoléon Bonaparte’s army landed in Egypt, its declared goal was to liberate the country from the despotic rule of the Ottomans. Granting freedom to the country’s minority of Orthodox Christians, the Copts, was the second task of the French colonial troops. Upon arriving in Egypt, the...

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3. The Pasha’s Settlers, Bulls, and Bandits (1805–1848)

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pp. 70-94

Between 1820 and 1824, a series of unprecedented revolts erupted in Upper Egypt, all from Qina Province, aiming to overthrow the regime of Muhammad ?Ali Pasha. Th roughout the long, rigid forty-year reign of Muhammad ?Ali (d. 1848), Egypt had never witnessed such outbreaks, in either the country?s north or south. Ahmad al-Salah, an Arab shaykh, led the ...

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4. A “Communist” Revolution (1848–1882)

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pp. 95-121

In 1864, a massive Egyptian revolt once again erupted from Qina Province. Ahmad al-Tayyib did what his father had done forty years earlier during Muhammad ‘Ali’s reign: he led tens of thousands of peasants in an attempt to overthrow the government. Th e rebels attacked the steamboats of...

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5. Rebellion in the Time of Cholera (1882–1950)

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pp. 122-146

In 1885, three years aft er the British colonization of Egypt, an incident that appeared to be an ordinary theft in a village market revealed the existence of a gang of audacious bandits. It was a period of dark, hard days in Qina Province, deep in the south of Egypt, as signs of a serious cholera breakout...

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Epilogue: America—The Last Imagined Empire?

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pp. 147-156

On the eve of the Egyptian Revolution of 2011, the US administration was acting as another empire, a sole global hegemon, in the south and north of Egypt and most of the world. Aft er the end of the Cold War, many theorists asserted that America functioned as an “informal,” “postmodern” empire...

Notes

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pp. 157-186

Bibliography

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pp. 187-197

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Art Credits

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pp. 198-198

Figure 1. Sir Gardner Wilkinson, Hand-book for Travellers in Egypt (London: John Murray, 1847), 449. Book is courtesy of Oberlin College?s Mudd Figure 2. R. J. C. Broadhurst (trans.), Th e Travels of Ibn Jubayr (London: Jonathan Cape, 1951), 30?31.Book is courtesy of Ohio University Figure 3. Sir Gardner Wilkinson, Hand-book for Travellers in Egypt (London: ...

Index

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pp. 199-201