Cover

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p. 1

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-28

The suburbs of northern Virginia once formed part of the nation’s capital. They weren’t suburbs then. They were a mix of farms, parade grounds, colonial ports, and small incorporated towns and villages. Still, their lands joined with the topography of Maryland to create the District...

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1 The Covert Intimacies of Langley and Dulles

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pp. 29-82

Many observers seem unsure as to whether “Langley” is a place or an idea. Just as “Washington” is a synonym for the executive branch and Congress, Langley is often the CIA writ large: Langley thinks, Langley acts, Langley feels. But the CIA complex is a three-dimensional place. Its placement...

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2 At Home with the CIA

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pp. 83-122

In Rangoon, Burma, in 1952 and 1953, in the wake of the Chinese revolution, Donald and Jane Wilhelm enjoyed “an unusually good family life” in a five-bedroom house with two bathrooms. Large ceiling fans stirred the air over their teak furniture. “Due to a semi-caste system of labor,” nine servants...

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3 Saigon Road: The Co-Constituted Landscape of Northern Virginia and South Vietnam

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pp. 123-162

Imperial space is often imagined through a binary relationship between metropole and colony, in which power trickles from center to periphery, and both retain their location. As an American suburb, Northern Virginia would appear to be sealed off from these relationships by design, as...

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4 The Fall of South Vietnam and the Transnational Intimacies of Falls Church, Arlington, and McLean

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pp. 163-219

Recently returned from the fall of Saigon, CIA analyst Frank Snepp sat in a brand-new apartment complex on Columbia Pike in Arlington, Virginia. The complex stood at the metropolitanized DC edge of the Dulles Corridor. It was September 1977. Just up the street from the Pentagon, he was finishing...

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5 Iran-Contra as Built Space: U.S. Imperial Tehran in Exile and Edge City's Central American Presence

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pp. 220-293

In 1987, observers noticed a new skyline in the suburbs of the covert capital. The seventeen-story Tycon Towers I, designed by the architects John Burgee and Philip Johnson and the whimsical developer James T. Lewis, surged over the trees. At the height of his fame as the inventor of the postmodern...

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Conclusion

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pp. 294-306

In 2006, observers noticed a new built environment in the suburbs of the covert capital. Investigative journalists, charting the “War on Terror” in the wake of the September 11th attacks, found a militarized landscape in Northern Virginia’s “glass-and-steel office boxes . . . distinguishable only to...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 307-308

Thanks to Asali Solomon, without whom, in innumerable ways, this book would not have been possible. This project benefited from a wise committee in the American Studies program at Yale. Thanks to Michael Denning, without whose spirit of inquiry, conceptual vision, interdisciplinary imagination...

Notes

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pp. 309-380

Index

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pp. 381-419