Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

I am fortunate to have received encouragement from family, friends, mentors, and colleagues for as long as I can remember. My mom, Diane Delmont, gets top billing because she has played the largest role in my life. Among many things, what I value most...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

In August 1957, teenagers across the country started watching teenagers in Philadelphia dance on television. Thanks to American Bandstand, the fi rst national daily television program directed at teenagers, Philadelphia emerged as the epicenter of the national youth...

read more

1. Making Philadelphia Safe for “WFIL-adelphia”: Television, Housing, and Defensive Localism in Bandstand’s Backyard

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-49

Throughout 1954, white and African American teenagers fought outside of WFIL-TV’s West Philadelphia studio on an almost daily basis. Philadelphia experienced more than its share of racial tension in this era, but these teenager brawls stand out because they...

read more

2. They Shall Be Heard: Local Television as a Civil Rights Battleground

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 50-67

They Shall Be Heard is a road not taken. While Bandstand introduced Philadelphia teenagers to new popular music, dances, and fashion styles, another local program used television to educate teenagers about intercultural issues. Produced by the Fellowship Commission...

read more

3. The de Facto Dilemma: Fighting Segregation in Philadelphia Public Schools

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 68-100

When the Philadelphia School Board published “For Every Child: The Story of Integration in the Philadelphia Public Schools” in 1960, it was the latest and most public rejoinder to the civil rights advocates who criticized the board for failing to address...

read more

4. From Little Rock to Philadelphia: Making de Facto School Segregation a Media Issue

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-125

In her introduction to Freedom North, historian Jeanne Theoharis contends that in “history textbooks, college classrooms, fi lms, and pop u lar celebration, African American protest movements in the North appear as ancillary and subsequent to the ‘real’ movement...

read more

5. The Rise of Rock and Roll in Philadelphia: Georgie Woods, Mitch Thomas, and Dick Clark

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 126-156

Starting in 1957, millions of teenagers across the country tuned into American Bandstand every afternoon to watch Philadelphia teenagers dance to the most popular music of the day. The history of...

read more

6. “They’ll Be Rockin’ on Bandstand, in Philadelphia, P.A.”: Imagining National Youth Culture on American Bandstand

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 157-179

It was no accident that Chuck Berry made reference to American Bandstand when he released “Sweet Little Sixteen” in January 1958. Berry made his national television debut on American Bandstand in 1957, and including these lyrics helped ensure that...

read more

7. Remembering American Bandstand, Forgetting Segregation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-194

More than fifty years after the show first broadcast, American Bandstand’s representations of youth culture remain closely linked both to the show’s legacy and to larger questions about popular culture, race, and civil rights. Since the late 1970s, Dick Clark has claimed...

read more

8. Still Boppin’ on Bandstand: American Dreams, Hairspray, and American Bandstand in the 2000s

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 195-222

For a show that left tele vi sion in 1989, American Bandstand was very busy in the 2000s. In 2007, Time Life promoted “Dick Clark’s American Bandstand 50th Anniversary Collection” through...

read more

Conclusion: Everybody Knows about American Bandstand

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-228

While Nina Simone never performed on American Bandstand, her song “Mississippi Goddam” offers a lens through which to examine the issues at the heart of this book. In her autobiography, Simone recalled...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-282

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 283-297