Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

Writing history is an adventure. At the end of my work I marvel at the surprises I’ve encountered and the new friends I’ve made. While researching the lives, and then telling the story of the people who populate my books, they visit my thoughts daily. When my work is over, I miss them, but know they will always be with me. That is especially true with this book. Arthur Vanderbilt...

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Prologue. Power Doesn’t Corrupt: It Reveals

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pp. 1-7

Newark lawyer Arthur Vanderbilt was furious. He knew that Jersey City Mayor Frank Hague would do anything to control the New Jersey governorship, but this?
With twenty of twenty-one counties reporting, Essex County Republican Lester Clee was leading by more than 84,000 votes. Finally, long after everywhere else had reported, the vote out of Hudson County...

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Chapter 1. Sadie’s Saga

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pp. 8-19

Sadie Urback hadn’t planned on being a widow so soon. Her husband Jack’s job — driving a laundry truck — wasn’t dangerous. When he suffered a fatal brain aneurism in November 1937 at age thirty-nine, Sadie was bereft. Despite the shock, she knew her husband had been paying premiums on a life insurance policy. Jack was conscientious about his health...

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Chapter 2. Roseville’s Prodigy

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pp. 20-35

Catching the 7:40 a.m. train out of Newark to lower Manhattan, then scrambling to catch the uptown subway, Arthur Vanderbilt arrived at Columbia Law School two hours after leaving home. The remainder of the day was devoted to attending class and studying in the library. On the return trip he read case law and started reviewing his lesson plans for the classes...

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Chapter 3. The Lawyer as Public Person

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pp. 36-47

World War I was raging and many of Newark’s factories were working overtime manufacturing materials for the war effort. It was late afternoon, and Vanderbilt was returning from arguing a case out of town when he was met at the train station by a client, the head of a large tool company. The businessman was frantic. A lawyer was his only hope. The day before, his key foreman...

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Chapter 4. A Force in Four Worlds

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pp. 48-65

John Butterworth and Roger Baldwin may have had names reminiscent of Colonial era Puritans, but they weren’t pious pilgrims. Butterworth was a union activist, a relentless, tough, in-your-face agitator, ready to wage war for the rights of workers. He was the leader of the Associated Silk Workers Union and viewed the owners of Paterson’s silk mills as the enemy. Baldwin had served time in federal prison for his very public resistance...

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Chapter 5. Up from the Horseshoe

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pp. 66-84

Hague. Hague, who grew up in poverty so severe that children in his neighborhood became petty thieves to help their families survive, yet who while serving as mayor amassed a fortune through grand theft, the true scale of which will never be known. Hague, who learned early how to use his fists and made them part of his political arsenal, never flinching at punching...

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Chapter 6. The Celtic Chieftain

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pp. 85-98

People stood in line down the length of the hall and out the building. The scene at City Hall on New Year’s Day in Jersey City was reminiscent of a feudal lord summoning his serfs to his castle yearly, pledging his continued protection in exchange for their payment of land rents. Each January 1, despite the fact that local government reorganized every fourth year...

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Chapter 7. Clean Government versus Hagueism

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pp. 99-111

Vanderbilt’s Clean Government Republicans were anxious to take their reform agenda to the entire state. Although they had made progress on a range of legislative issues, Frank Hague remained a hurdle to any serious measures for fulfilling Arthur Vanderbilt’s quest to reform the state’s judiciary. The Jersey City mayor’s relationship with whoever occupied the governor’s chair...

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Chapter 8. Box 96: Arthur and David

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pp. 112-126

David Dayton McKean. Three generations later the name is tied tightly to Frank Hague, quoted in hundreds of historical works and news articles. The first place historians, journalists, and screenwriters turn to when then want to know about the bad old days in Jersey City under Hague is McKean’s book, The Boss: The Hague Machine in Action.1

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Chapter 9. The Inventor’s Son

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pp. 127-141

Frank Hague was always on the lookout for a candidate he could control, especially one for statewide office. He hoped that the inventor’s son was one. With Thomas Edison his father, Charles Edison’s name and lineage would make him a potent candidate for any public office he sought in New Jersey. Hague wanted him to be U.S. senator and was willing to meet with Edison...

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Chapter 10. The Archbishop Shows His Gratitude

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pp. 142-154

Sunday before Election Day. The timing was murder. Two days before the vote on the public referendum that Arthur Vanderbilt believed would propel New Jersey in a new direction, Roman Catholics heard from the pulpit that bingo was in jeopardy. A mindless game of chance involving random numbers matched to preprinted cards, the odds were long and the bets...

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Chapter 11. Haddonfield’s Mensch

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pp. 155-169

Almost twenty years into his quest, nine years following the theft of Lester Clee’s election, and little more than eighteen months after being hammered by Hague and his pal the archbishop, Arthur Vanderbilt was exhausted. Yet there were no breathers on his schedule. His obligations to his law practice, fund-raising commitments made as dean of NYU’s law school...

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Chapter 12. Things Get Curious

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pp. 170-183

Irate doesn’t quite describe Vanderbilt’s state of mind. Following approval of legislation authorizing a constitutional convention, he began telling people that any hope of meaningful reform had been undermined and that Driscoll was “a damned double-crosser.”1
Vanderbilt was always plotting: it’s likely he had every vote counted in a sixty-delegate convention...

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Chapter 13. Summer at Rutgers

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pp. 184-199

North Harpswell, Maine, is mostly water, rock, and trees. Its beauty is austere and primal. This remote village on Casco Bay wasn’t anyone’s idea of a resort in the first half of the twentieth century, yet in the summer of 1947 it became a safe haven for the Warrior Lawyer.
Floss and Arthur lived in an era when teenage sweethearts married and remained faithful...

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Chapter 14. The Chief

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pp. 200-217

Education was central to Arthur Vanderbilt’s life. Through his teaching evening classes to Newark factory workers while attending Columbia Law School, instructing law students two nights a week for thirty-four years, mentoring scores of young lawyers who had worked in his law firm throughout his career, and giving hundreds of speeches on law reform across the nation...

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Chapter 15. The Chief Supreme

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pp. 218-234

Commuting to work by train was a routine for Arthur Vanderbilt dating back to his years attending Columbia Law School. Most days began with a quick drive to the Short Hills railroad station, where he parked his car and boarded a train to Newark or, depending upon his schedule, continued on to Trenton, New York, or Washington. Not long after Vanderbilt...

Notes

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pp. 235-248

Bibliography

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pp. 249-250

Index

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pp. 251-260

About the Author

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pp. 261-262

Image Plates

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pp. Image 1-Image 16