Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

I remember, as a boy, standing on a stepladder hauled through the morning mist every April by my father, Kenneth Hutchins, so that I could see an orderly line of soldiers in the scarlet uniforms of British regulars march across the green at...

read more

Introduction: The Stamp Act, from Beginning to End

Zachary McLeod Hutchins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xxii

The individual mandate provision of the 2010 Affordable Care Act requires that every citizen of the United States maintain minimum, essential health insurance coverage or pay a penalty. When the constitutionality of this provision was challenged...

Part 1 | Ritual Responses to the Stamp Act

read more

1. The Sermon That Didn’t Start the Revolution: Jonathan Mayhew’s Role in the Boston Stamp Act Riots

J. Patrick Mullins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 3-35

On January 30, 1750, Jonathan Mayhew, pastor of the Congregational meetinghouse in Boston’s West End neighborhood, offered a performance from his pulpit that historian Bernard Bailyn dubbed “the most famous sermon preached in...

read more

2. Buried Liberties and Hanging Effigies: Imperial Persuasion, Intimidation, and Performance during the Stamp Act Crisis

Molly Perry

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-66

In August 1765, a correspondent in Connecticut reported the rapid spread of a “noble patriotic fire” lighting up “in one place and another.” The flames, which first “shown so conspicuous at Boston” in the riots recounted by Patrick Mullins in chapter...

Part 2 | The Poetics of Taxation

read more

3. “Daring to Try the King’s Patience?”: (Futile?) Resistance versus Insatiability in Fabula Neoterica

Gilbert L. Gigliotti

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 69-88

In the 27 May 1765 supplement of the Boston Gazette appeared an anonymous, twenty-four-line, neo-Latin poem in dactylic hexameter, Fabula Neoterica vel Dialogus inter Leonem et Murem, “A Modern Fable or A Dialogue between a Lion and...

read more

4. Letters from a Woman in Pennsylvania, or Elizabeth Graeme Fergusson Dreams of John Dickinson

Caroline Wigginton

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-112

To read the historiography of the Stamp Act Crisis is to learn it was a contest between men. Prime Minister George Grenville orchestrated its passage; Virginian orator Patrick Henry heatedly counseled legislative resolutions in protest; in American...

Part 3 | The Levy and the Slave

read more

5. The Slave Narrative and the Stamp Act, or Letters from Two American Farmers in Pennsylvania

Zachary McLeod Hutchins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-147

One enduring legacy of the Stamp Act, 250 years after its passage in 1765, is an ongoing willingness among conservative American politicians and pundits to equate political coercion generally, and oppressive tax policies more specifically, with...

read more

6. “Providence never designed us for Negroes”: Slavery and British Subjecthood in the Stamp Act Crisis, 1764–1766

Alexander R. Jablonski

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-176

On the morning of May 30, 1765, Francis Bernard took the floor of the Massachusetts General Court to speak of filial and civic duty. His tenure as the royal governor of that province had always been a rather fitful one, involving regular disputes...

read more

7. “Homespun,” “Indian Corn,” and the “indigestible...Stamp Act”: An Empire of Stereotype in Franklin’s Letters to the London Press

Todd Nathan Thompson

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-198

On February 13, 1766, Benjamin Franklin stood for four hours before the House of Commons to answer questions about the Stamp Act and to urge its repeal. He ended his testimony with the following answers to questions that had probably been...

read more

8. Redness and the Contest of Anglo-American Empires

Clay Zuba

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 199-222

While London editorialists referred to the colonists as consumers of Indian corn during the Stamp Act Crisis, London engravers went a step further, picturing the colonies as a red Indian. The first British political print to protest the Stamp...

read more

Afterword: Corporatism and the Stamp Act Crisis

Zachary McLeod Hutchins

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-232

If, as the foregoing chapters have suggested, the Stamp Act Crisis was an event that fractured more than fomented national identity, it was, nevertheless, a moment in which individuals from disparate backgrounds regularly banded together...

About the Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-234

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-242