Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

The authors would like to express their sincere gratitude to the Positive Charge intervention staff for their dedication and invaluable contributions to this work. We appreciate their graciously sharing their experiences with us through interviews and surveys, as well as reviewing draft s of this book. We would also like...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

There are approximately 1.2 million people living with HIV (PLWH) in the United States (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2012a). Roughly 50,000 individuals are newly diagnosed with HIV annually, and some populations, including younger individuals (20–24 years of age), Black/African...

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Methods

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pp. 7-14

AIDS United’s Positive Charge (PC) program took place at five locations around the United States. Each location had a lead organization and collaborated with local partners to implement PC. Local partners included medical providers, AIDS service organizations, and social service organizations. All...

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Executive Summaries of Case Study Findings

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pp. 15-23

The Louisiana Positive Charge (PC) network identified out-of-care people living with HIV (PLWH) and linked them to and retained them in HIV primary care. The network comprised ten organizations: three Louisiana State University clinics, a public health institute, a health department, a county...

Case Studies

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Multiple Cities in the State of Louisiana

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pp. 24-44

In 2011, Louisiana had the third-highest HIV diagnosis rate of all U.S. states, the District of Columbia, and six dependent areas at 30.2 per 100,000 individuals and the fourth-highest AIDS diagnosis rate at 18.4 per 100,000. There were 17,411 people living with HIV and AIDS in Louisiana, 53% of whom had...

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Chicago

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pp. 45-61

As of June 2013, there were 16,538 people living with HIV (PLWH) and 18,608 people living with AIDS in Chicago, including 691 HIV cases diagnosed from January to June of 2013 and 454 AIDS cases in this time period (Illinois Department of Public Health [IDPH] 2013). As seen nationally, Black/African...

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New York City

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pp. 62-80

New York City had the highest number of diagnosed HIV infections in the United States at the end of 2010, even when compared with other heavily affected metropolitan areas such as Los Angeles, Chicago, Miami, and San Francisco (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 2011a). Among all U.S. metropolitan...

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San Francisco / Bay Area

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pp. 81-101

California had 49,473 total cumulative HIV cases from April 2006 to December 31, 2013, when the disease was first reported by name. California also had 168,602 total cumulative AIDS cases from the beginning of the epidemic to December 31, 2013 (California Department of Public Health [CDPH] 2013)...

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Multiple Regions in the State of North Carolina

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pp. 102-122

In 2009, North Carolina had the eighth-highest rate of HIV diagnoses among the U.S. states at 23.8 per 100,000 and the eleventh-highest rate of AIDS diagnoses at 11.2 per 100,000 (Foust and Clymore 2011). In 2011, there were an estimated 25,607 adults and adolescents living with HIV in North Carolina. The total...

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Conclusions

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pp. 123-133

This volume describes an embedded multiple-case study of five individual Positive Charge (PC) programs. Across all sites, many PC implementation experiences were shared. Almost all sites hired additional staff to conduct linkage-to-care activities and increased their organizations’ focus on linkage...

Appendix A. Semistructured Case Study Interview Guide

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pp. 134-135

Appendix B. Network Collaboration Survey Questions

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pp. 136-140

References

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pp. 141-146

Index

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pp. 147-152