In this Book

Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States
summary
This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide.
Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. Den Ouden, Timothy Q. Evans (Haliwa-Saponi), Les W. Field, Angela A. Gonzales (Hopi), Rae Gould (Nipmuc), J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), K. Alexa Koenig, Alan Leventhal, Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Wilkins (Lumbee).

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Introduction
  2. Amy E. Den Ouden & Jean M. O’Brien
  3. pp. 1-34
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  1. PART I: Race, Identity, and Recognition
  2. pp. 35-36
  1. The Imposition of Law: The Federal Acknowledgment Process and the Legal De/Construction of Tribal Identity
  2. Angela A. Gonzales & Timotothy Q. Evans
  3. pp. 37-64
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  1. Racial Science and Federal Recognition: Lumbee Indians in the Jim Crow South
  2. Malinda Maynor Lo Lowery
  3. pp. 65-94
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  1. The Recognition of NAGPRA: A Human Rights Promise Deferred
  2. Joanne Barker
  3. pp. 95-114
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  1. State Recognition of American Indian Tribes: A Survey of State-Recognized Tribes and State Recognition Processes
  2. K . Alexa Koe Koenig & Jonathan Stein
  3. pp. 115-146
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  1. PART II: State and Federal Recognition in New England
  2. pp. 147-148
  1. State Recognition and “Termination” in Nineteenth-Century New England
  2. Jean M. O’Brien
  3. pp. 149-168
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  1. Altered State?: Indian Policy Narratives, Federal Recognition, and the “New” War on Native Rights in Connecticut
  2. Amy E. Den Ouden
  3. pp. 169-194
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  1. How You See Us, Why You Don’t: Connecticut’s Public Policy to Terminate the Schaghticoke Indians
  2. Ruth Garby Torres
  3. pp. 195-212
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  1. The Nipmuc Nation, Federal Acknowledgment, and a Case of Mistaken Identity
  2. Rae Gould
  3. pp. 213-234
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  1. PART III: Contemporary Recognition Controversies
  2. pp. 235-236
  1. A Right Delayed: The Brothertown Indian Nation’s Story of Surviving the Federal Acknowledgment Process
  2. Katheen n A. Brown-Perez
  3. pp. 237-262
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  1. From “Boston Men” to the BIA: The Unacknowledged Chinook Nation
  2. John R. Robinson
  3. pp. 263-286
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  1. Mapping Erasure: The Power of Nominative Cartography in the Past and Present of the Muwekma Ohlones of the San Francisco Bay Area
  2. Les W. Field
  3. pp. 287-310
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  1. Precarious Positions: Native Hawaiians and U.S. Federal Recognition
  2. J. Kēhaulani Kauanui
  3. pp. 311-336
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  1. Afterword
  2. David E. Wilkins
  3. pp. 337-344
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  1. Appendix: Useful Resources for Further Study
  2. pp. 345-348
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 349-352
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 353-365
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