In this Book

The Adams-Jefferson Letters
summary
An intellectual dialogue of the highest plane achieved in America, the correspondence between John Adams and Thomas Jefferson spanned half a century and embraced government, philosophy, religion, quotidiana, and family griefs and joys. First meeting as delegates to the Continental Congress in 1775, they initiated correspondence in 1777, negotiated jointly as ministers in Europe in the 1780s, and served the early Republic--each, ultimately, in its highest office. At Jefferson's defeat of Adams for the presidency in 1800, they became estranged, and the correspondence lapses from 1801 to 1812, then is renewed until the death of both in 1826, fifty years to the day after the Declaration of Independence.

Lester J. Cappon's edition, first published in 1959 in two volumes, provides the complete correspondence between these two men and includes the correspondence between Abigail Adams and Jefferson. Many of these letters have been published in no other modern edition, nor does any other edition devote itself exclusively to the exchange between Jefferson and the Adamses. Introduction, headnotes, and footnotes inform the reader without interrupting the speakers. This reissue of The Adams-Jefferson Letters in a one-volume unabridged edition brings to a broader audience one of the monuments of American scholarship and, to quote C. Vann Woodward, 'a major treasure of national literature.'

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright, Dedication
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. vii-xxii
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. xxiii-xxx
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. xxxi-xlviii
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  1. 1. "The great Work of Confederation, draggs heavily on"
  2. pp. 52-62
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  1. 2. "The Subject of a Treaty of Commerce"
  2. pp. 63-122
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  1. 3. "As We are poor We ought to be {Economists"
  2. pp. 123-175
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  1. 4. "Abate the ardor of those pyrates against us"
  2. pp. 176-213
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  1. 5. "The first principle of a good government"
  2. pp. 214-255
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  1. 6. "On ... Guard against the immeasurable avarice of Amsterdam"
  2. pp. 256-289
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  1. 7. "The Age of Experiments in Government"
  2. pp. 290-315
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  1. 8. "Faithfull are the wounds of a Friend"
  2. pp. 316-333
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  1. 9. "Whether you or I 'were right Posterity must judge"
  2. pp. 334-391
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  1. 10. "Belief ...the assent of the mind to an intelligible proposition"
  2. pp. 392-464
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  1. 11. "The Eighteenth Century ... most honourable to human Nature"
  2. pp. 465-525
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  1. 12. "The advantages of education ...on the broad scale"
  2. pp. 526-602
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  1. 13. "Calms succeeding the storm which our Argosy ... so stoutly weathered"
  2. pp. 603-665
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 666-689
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