Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

This project began as my dissertation, and I am grateful to faculty at Temple University who played key roles in shaping the initial concept and offering suggestions for its future. Chief among them was my doctoral committee chair, Patricia Bradley, of the Department of Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising, who gaveme the freedom to explore interdisciplinary studies...

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-16

In the summer of 1998, Time magazine asked on its cover, ‘‘Is FeminismDead?’’ The question stood out against a black background under the disembodied heads of Susan B. Anthony, Betty Friedan, Gloria Steinem, and . . . thetelevision sitcomcharacter AllyMcBeal.The cover story nostalgically remembered the 1970s as an era when ‘‘feminists made big, unambiguous...

read more

Chapter 1. From True Woman to New Woman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-36

Throughout 1897, the Ladies’ Home Journal ran a series of six fullpage illustrations collectivelytitled ‘‘The American Woman.’’Drawnby Alice Barber Stephens, an artist with a national following (one journalist of the day called her ‘‘the dean’’ of female illustrators),1 the images were promoted by the Journal as ‘‘something...

read more

Chapter 2. The American Girl

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 37-55

While it showcased the American Woman of Alice Barber Stephens during the late 1890s, the Ladies’ Home Journal also was publishing the work of an artist whose fame would eclipse hers in the opening years of the new century. In February 1903, when the Journal became the first magazine to reach a circulation of one...

read more

Chapter 3. Dangerous Women and the Crisis of Masculinity

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-74

Long before there were mass media, artists and novelists depicted women as either ‘‘good’’ or ‘‘bad,’’ a dichotomy in which good women made men stronger and bad women destroyed them. The opposition of the virgin and the vamp has been a theme of media, and media criticism, throughout the twentieth...

read more

Chapter 4. Alternative Visions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-100

In 1909, Cosmopolitan magazine published a short story, ‘‘The Emancipation of Sarah,’’ about a young Jewish woman named Sarah and her over bearing mother who believed that they had been successful in converting Sarah’s immigrant suitor to feminism and socialism. Immediately after marrying her, however,...

read more

Chapter 5. Patriotic Images

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 101-120

Though suffrage and sex-role-reversal imagery continued to appear in American media through the end of women’s drive for the vote, the more radical messages of the Masses disappeared when the magazine folded in 1917, the year the United States entered World War I. Throughout popular culture, the...

read more

Chapter 6. The Flapper

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-135

The playful woman of the teens had one last, brief moment in the media spotlight—in slightly altered form. In movies, magazines, and newmassmarket novels of the 1920s, the ‘‘flapper’’was another fearless, dancing, sex-crazed girl. Yet she was not terribly dangerous (she liked men), and she was much more fun than the vamp. Not an exotic creature, she was ‘‘recognizable as the...

read more

Chapter 7. The Modern American Family

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 136-159

In the postwar era, most middle-class girls, however carefree in their youth, did grow up to marry and have children and to make homemaking their primary role.1 In popular culture and in real life, though, the American wife of the 1920s was cut of a somewhat different cloth thantheVictorian eraTrueWoman...

read more

Chapter 8. The Advertising Connection

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 160-181

Since the first national advertising campaigns more than a century ago, American manufacturers have promised that their products offered a ‘‘new’’ way of adhering to old values. Advertising is especially persuasive when it offers the new through familiar imagery.1 In the earliest mass market ad campaigns, which...

read more

Epilogue and Discussion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 182-192

The artwork in the preceding chapters offers a larger picture of how the New Woman, a political concept in the 1890s, became commercialized and diffused by the 1920s, a process that played out in the first American mass media and against the cultural backdrops of the suffrage movement and a modern consumer society. These images also collectively trace how a broader...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-220

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 221-238

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 239-252