Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

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Foreword

Ken Bain

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pp. ix-x

When I started teaching U.S. political history in college in the 1960s, I knew my subject well, but I knew little about how to help other people learn. Before the first class meeting, the chair of the department gave me a list of the students who had enrolled in the course, told me the room number...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Just as teaching involves a dialogue with students, the writing of this book has engaged me in an extended dialogue with colleagues, students, friends, and editors, as well as the writings of scholars. They have enriched this book more than they know. Let me begin at the beginning. Thomas LeBien showed up in my o≈ce one afternoon and gave...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-4

Welcome to your first year of teaching. This book will serve, I hope, as a travel guide to accompany you through the opportunities and quandaries that you’ll experience as you launch your career. We will spend most of the time on the challenges that will occupy most of your time: developing...

PART I. PREMISES

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1 Understanding Yourself as a Teacher

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pp. 7-12

When most novice (and not-so-novice) instructors start to plan a course, they focus with varying degrees of excitement and anxiety on the subject matter. But in doing so they are leapfrogging two crucial questions: ‘‘Why do you want to teach?’’ and ‘‘What kind of a teacher do you want...

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2 Understanding Your Students

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pp. 13-22

Teaching is an interactive process, whether it involves Pablo Casals and a student sitting knees to knees or a professor orating to 350 people. The size of a class matters. But that is only the most visible circumstance shaping the pedagogical relationship. A teacher also needs to take into account less visible and even invisible circumstances. In this chapter..

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3 Defining Your Aims and Outcomes

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pp. 23-32

Now that you have reflected upon yourself and your students, is to define the two halves of the teaching/learning dialogue: aims and outcomes. On the one hand, you want to convey crucial aspects of your subject in lucid, interesting fashion. On the other hand, you want to change how your students think...

PART II. PRACTICES

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4 Constructing a Syllabus

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pp. 35-46

Having defined the destination of your course, you’re ready to lay out the more specific ‘‘promises’’ that will take you and your students along the route. This chapter will help you construct a class-by-class calendar, including lectures, discussions, and reading and writing assignments—in sum, a ‘‘promising...

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5 Lecturing

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pp. 47-55

If you eavesdrop on college classrooms, odds are that the voice you hear will be the professor’s. According to a 1987 study of undergraduate liberal arts programs at more than eighty universities, lecturing was the instructional method in 81 percent of social science courses, 89 percent...

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6 Discussing

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pp. 56-74

In your graduate program, you may have served as a teaching assistant and learned to facilitate discussions by small groups. What you probably haven’t done, however, is synchronize smallgroup discussions with other parts of a course. Ideally, discussions, lectures, readings, and writing...

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7 Broadening the Learning Environment

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pp. 75-91

So far we have focused on four kinds of pedagogical activities: listen, read, talk, and write. These ingredients constitute the usual recipes for teaching and learning. Now let’s expand your repertoire even further. This chapter will sketch more adventurous ways in which your students can learn...

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8 Evaluating and Grading

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pp. 92-112

Two students are chatting at the end of the semester. ‘‘What did you get out of Dominguez’s course?’’ ‘‘I got a C-plus.’’ ‘‘Tough luck. I got a B.’’ Of course one shouldn’t hear them literally. They ‘‘got’’ more than an alphabet letter out of all those lectures, discussions, writing assignments, and other activities on which Professor Dominguez lavished so much e√ort. Still...

PART III. EXTRACURRICULARS

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9 Relating to Students

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pp. 115-121

During his freshman year at the University of Texas at Austin, Willie Morris—newly arrived from rural Yazoo City, Mississippi— was invited to the apartment of a young graduate student and his wife. The walls of their apartment were lined with books, more books than I had ever seen before in a private dwelling—books everywhere and on everything. I was astonished...

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10 Teaching and Not Perishing

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pp. 122-131

It’s not the same as a robber shouting ‘‘your money or your life!’’ But among untenured faculty the warning to ‘‘publish or perish’’ arouses a comparable sense of dread. According to the standard formula, unless you produce a book or at least several articles in scholarly journals within six years, all your work and hopes for a career will be shot down...

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Conclusion

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pp. 132-134

How to conclude? I found this to be a surprisingly perplexing question. After considerable reflection, I understand why. To close this book would violate one of the principles that it has been espousing. Teaching and learning should not ‘‘finish’’ or ‘‘terminate’’ at the end of a course or a year...

Notes

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pp. 135-144

If You Want to Learn More: A Selected, Annotated Bibliography

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pp. 145-156

Index

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pp. 157-160