Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

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Contents

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pp. vii-x

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TWO GILDED AGES: A Preface

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pp. xi-xvii

IIn July 2007, as the U.S. economy began to sour, the front-page headlines of the Sunday New York Times proclaimed, “The Richest of the Rich, Proud of a New Gilded Age. . . . The Nation’s Wealthiest Say They Are Proud of New Gilded Age.” The wealth of the newest American tycoons, reported the Times, “has made the early years...

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DANGER & OPPORTUNITY: An Introduction

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pp. 20-47

Like a time capsule packed with treasures, the Gilded Age opens on a dazzling fashion show of ladies and working girls in their late-1800s upswept hair and ostrich-plumed hats. They parade in colorful, floor-length, puffed-sleeve dresses and promenade arm-in-arm with whiskered gentlemen and dandies wearing swallowtail coats with fashionable creaseless trousers. They ...

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1 The Dangerous Trades

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pp. 48-75

The brass cuspidor surely caught Dr. Alice Hamilton’s eye when she arrived at the National Lead Company office on Chicago’s Sangamon Street a few minutes ahead of her scheduled appointment with the company vice president. The cuspidor (or spittoon), a receptacle for spit tobacco juice, signaled men’s territory and the all too common viewpoint that came with it: “Men knew the world. Women didn’t...

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2 The Pittsburgh Survey

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pp. 76-107

Dressed for travel in a coat and tie, John R. Commons, a professor of economics at the University of Wisconsin, stepped onto the railroad platform at the Madison depot, where he met up with his three young men graduate students. It was a hot summer day in 1907, and the four made small talk while waiting for their train. Nobody on the platform had reason to be especially curious about the professor and three young...

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3 Justice, Not Pity

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pp. 108-141

Why do babies die? The lady traveler pondered the question with intense concentration as she crossed the marble concourse of Washington, D.C.’s Union Station in the late spring of 1912. The awful question cut across every category of life in the United States. Hanging unanswered, it shadowed families and communities and darkened the nation’s very future. Of the 2.5 million babies born in the United States...

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4 The Wages of Work

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pp. 142-182

January 1899. A New England gentleman, John Graham Brooks, caught a New York Central train for Chicago. The famous Water Level Route sped him along the Hudson River and Lakes Ontario and Erie until he crossed the frozen stubble fields and industrial zone of Indiana and reached Chicago’s Union Station. Brooks’s destination...

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5 Citizen

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pp. 183-223

In the heavy heat of July 1905, Adolph Brandeis of Louisville, Kentucky, looked carefully at the several neatly folded newspaper clippings enclosed with letters from his adult son, Louis. Stuffing envelopes was a longtime father-son custom and a mainstay of conversation between the eighty-threeyear- old father and his forty-nine-year-old son. The excellent U.S. postal service helped. It helped...

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6 The Social Gospel

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pp. 224-258

In the autumn of 1908, the Baptist Protestant minister Walter Rauschenbusch arrived at the entrance of New York City’s lavish Waldorf-Astoria Hotel at Fifth Avenue and Thirty-fourth Street. The doorman who ushered in the tall, slim, “physically commanding” figure probably did not know he was the best-selling author of a controversial new book titled Christianity and the Social Crisis. Nor could the gold-buttoned...

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7 Lynching in All Its Phases

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pp. 259-293

The two-story family brick home was quiet when Ida B. Wells-Barnett sat down at her dining room table and reached for the Chicago Daily Tribune on November 10, 1909. So far, it was an ordinary day in the Wells-Barnett household. The four children, ages five to fourteen, were at school. Their father, the attorney Ferdinand L. Barnett,...

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PROGRESSIVE ENCORE?: A Postscript

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pp. 294-305

“All progress is experimental,” declared the American essayist John Jay Chapman in 1900. The success of the Progressives’ experiment became clear as the twentieth century unfolded. Their “experiment” persuaded the American people as a whole to reject child labor and to support education for children in all socioeconomic groups. It encouraged the public, in the main, to endorse human and financial...

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Suggested Reading

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pp. 306-307

The onset of the second Gilded Age prompted this project, which took shape from questions raised in the privileged setting of a yearlong seminar at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities at Vanderbilt University in 2005–6. Director Mona Frederick provided our interdisciplinary group with wide-ranging opportunities for our weekly discussions of feminist authority, and...

Notes

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pp. 308-367

Bibliography

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pp. 368-393

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 394-395

The onset of the second Gilded Age prompted this project, which took shape from ques-tions raised in the privileged setting of a yearlong seminar at the Robert Penn Warren Center for the Humanities at Vanderbilt University in 2005?6. Director Mona Frederick provided our interdisciplinary group with wide-ranging opportunities for our weekly dis-cussions of feminist authority, and throughout the year the notion of preparing profiles ...

Index

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pp. 396-401