Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. viii-xiii

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Preface

Kenneth L. Untied

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pp. xix-xv

This Publication of the Texas Folklore Society (#70) was several years in the making, gathering all the ingredients and carefully mixing them together to get this final product. Okay, that was as close to a pun as I’ll come when describing what it took to create the book that you hold in your hands. As you can tell, it contains a lot of recipes; however, I trust that you’ll...

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Introduction

Frances B. Vick

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pp. 1-10

When Ken Untiedt announced the topic of a Texas Folklore Society cookbook publication, my mind went off in several different directions. One of the first was remembering what that Renaissance woman—Jean Andrews, The Pepper Lady—had written about food: “Although food is eaten as a response to hunger, it is much more than filling one’s stomach...

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Stories and Recipes from The Piney Woods

Most of this area of some 16 million acres, ranges from about 50 to 780 feet above sea level and receives 40 to 56 inches of rain yearly. Many rivers, creeks, and bayous drain the region. Nearly all of Texas’ commercial timber comes from this area. There are three native species of pine, the principal timber...

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Family Recipe from Charles S. Taylor

Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison

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pp. 13-16

Charles Stanfield Taylor was born in 1808 in England, orphaned at an early age, and raised and educated in law by his uncle. When he came of age, he took his inheritance and came to America, landing in New York and sailing shortly thereafter to Louisiana. In 1828 he bought a horse in Natchitoches....

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Recipes from Sam Houston

Jane Monday

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pp. 17-20

Often when General Sam Houston was home, his Indian friends would visit the Woodlands. The Cherokees, in particular, liked to camp on the grounds of the Houston farm when they were traveling. Sometimes before leaving Washington, Houston would send word to the Indians giving them his...

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Recipes from Boardin’ in the Thicket

Wanda Landrey

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pp. 21-34

According to George Leonard and Bertha E. Herter’s Bull Cook and Authentic Historical Recipes, red-eye gravy, an old Southern favorite, got its name from General Andrew Jackson, the seventh President of the United States. One day, while Old Hickory was still a general, he sat down to have his...

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Recipes from Helpful Cooking Hints for Househusbands of Uppity Women

Archie P. McDonald

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pp. 35-40

It all started appropriately, by the dawn’s early light. Eve prepared the first meal for Adam by serving him a forbidden apple. Husbands have been snake-bitten ever since when it comes to getting food on the table. For ages after Adam enjoyed that first forbidden meal, men toiled to provide their bread...

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Boggy Slough Chili—50 Years of Chili Makin’ in East Texas

Ellen Temple

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pp. 41-46

The Neches is an ancient river that flows from springs in Van Zandt County 380 miles to Sabine Lake on the Gulf of Mexico. It is the ecological and cultural heart of the Pineywoods of East Texas. Primitive people such as the Clovis tribes, then the Caddo Indians, and then the Spanish, French and Anglo...

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Hanging the Meat, and Recipes for Mushrooms and Potatoes

Craig Stripling

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pp. 47-50

It is not always in every circle today that discussions can be had about the joys of hunting, harvesting, preparing, cooking, and eating wild game. Anyone reading this, however, is curious about the typical meat I slather in the mushroom and butter/cream sherry sauce recipe included herewith. When I was growing up in East Texas the main game to hunt was...

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My Dagwood Bumstead Sandwich

R. G. Dean

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pp. 51-54

When I was growing up in San Augustine, Texas during the 1930s and early 1940s, the social life of my family was limited—to say the least. As well as I can remember, the most likely social event in our annual calendar was the Homecoming and Dinner on the Ground at the Attoyac Cemetery in lower...

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Hershel Pudding

Janell Croley Chesnut

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pp. 55-58

This is a recipe that was popular with older women, including my grandmother, Jessie Chandler Croley (Mama). She prepared this for many years in Gilmer, in northeast Texas. There was a “Book Club” which met each month to visit and have a social time for the older women residents. Contrary to...

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Stories and Recipes from the Gulf Prairies and Marshes

The Gulf Prairies and Marshes cover approximately 10 million acres. There are two subunits: (a) the marsh and salt grasses immediately at tidewater, and (b) a little farther inland, a strip of bluestems, and tall grasses, with some gramas in the western part. Many of these grasses make excellent grazing....

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Maria’s Mom

Mary Margaret Dougherty Campbell

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pp. 61-74

John wanted to learn how to make tamales. One day in the faculty lounge at St. Joseph High School, he just happened to mention this desire. Without hesitating, Maria said, “My mom makes the best tamales I’ve ever eaten. She’s going to be visiting in a couple of weeks. Maybe I can talk her into a tamale-making lesson while she’s here.” By the time Mrs....

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My Favorite Stories and Recipes

Jean Granberry Schnitz

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pp. 75-92

Many years ago, I decided to compile a cookbook filled with recipes that were quick, easy, and economical. Originally, one of the purposes of the cookbook was to help my college-bound sons think of things to eat that they could cook without lots of ingredients or equipment. The book progressed very slowly for more than thirty years while I found other things...

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Observations on Cooking and Eating

Marilyn Manning

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pp. 93-96

When I was about eleven years old, my mother went to work at the post office in our little town. I was a very responsible kid and besides that, all the neighbors were watching my every move. If I had gone near to any trouble, my mother would have heard about it before I did it. That summer I was bored and...

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How I Saved Baby’s Life with My Mother’s Cornbread

Frances B. Vick

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pp. 97-100

When I was seventeen years old my mother sounded an alarm. It was not that she was going into the hospital for serious surgery, which she was. It was that if I didn’t learn how to make cornbread the way she did and the way Little Mother (her mother) had before her, there was a good chance...

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King Ranch Chicken

Phyllis Bridges

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pp. 101-101

This recipe is believed to have been developed by Henrietta King, owner of the King Ranch in South Texas. Henrietta and Richard King employed hundreds of workers of Mexican descent in their vast ranching empire. Henrietta showed an interest in the culture of her workers and adapted this recipe...

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Chicken and Green Chiles Casserole

Helen Corbitt

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pp. 102-104

Helen Corbitt makes the same sort of casserole the following way.*...

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New York Café Beef Enchiladas

Leon Hale

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pp. 105-110

I needed seven years to get a college diploma but it did help me find a job at Texas A&M in College Station. I was a sort of press agent there, and for a year I came close to starving. My salary was $200 a month and by the time they finished carving deductions out of it I had about $160 to put in...

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Stories and Recipes from the Post Oak Savannah

The secondary forest area, also called the Post Oak Belt, covers some 7 million acres. It is immediately west of the primary forest region, with less annual rainfall and a little higher elevation. Principal trees are post oak, blackjack...

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My Mother Was the Best Cook in Town

Robert Compton

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pp. 113-116

That’s what my dad used to say, and I sure didn’t know a better one. The Central Texas town where we lived was small in those days of the Great Depression (in that time, we didn’t call it that; we just said that “times were bad”), and almost every mother in town cooked family meals, and that meant...

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Central Texas Czech Recipes

Mary Koock

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pp. 117-122

I suppose I have catered for a thousand wedding receptions during my career. My friend Gina Mezzatti had the right idea about them. She said that the ceremony should be sweet and solemn and the reception fun and festive. “It is a time for great celebration—there should be music, champagne, dancing, food, and laughter!” Virginia Prasatik’s was such a...

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You Are What You Remember You Ate

Carolyn B. Edwards

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pp. 123-132

I don’t know how many loaves of bread Mom made in her lifetime of eighty some-odd years. When I was growing up as a baby boomer, she made at least three to six loaves every week, year after year. We did not buy “bought bread” except on very rare occasions. If there were crops in the...

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Ida Grohman’s Egg Noodles

Nelda Vick

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pp. 133-136

My mother was renowned for her egg noodles. They were great favorites at the food sales booths at the Sacred Heart Church in Rockne, Texas—at the Bazaar each fall and at the Spring Festival. They were made by Ida Goertz Grohman all through the lives of her children. The recipe probably came...

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Stories and Recipes from the Blackland Prairies

This area of about 12 million acres, while called a “prairie,” has much timber along the streams, including a variety of oaks, pecan, elm, bois d’arc, and mesquite. In its native state, it was largely a grassy plain—the first native grassland...

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Slang Jang: The National Dish of Honey Grove

John W. Wilson

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pp. 139-152

Those among you who don’t relish oysters—canned or raw—are free to leave the room. For those of you who choose to stay, I’ll tell you a tale about the origins, the rise to popularity and fame, and the decline, almost to obsolescence, of a delicious, invigorating, summertime concoction known...

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Old Settlers Beans

Pat Vick

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pp. 153-156

My wife Nelda and I were hosting a company party several years ago and needed the perfect complement to go with hamburgers and hot dogs. We could not think of anything so she called a good friend of hers who gave her this recipe for Old Settlers Beans. We liked this recipe so much that...

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Central Texas Canning Customs in the Thirties and Forties

Kenneth W. Davis

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pp. 157-164

Two-bit and four-bit pieces served useful purposes in the canning of preserves and jams before the coin of the realm was debased by the addition of copper. In old Bell County where I grew up, housewives (with sporadic help from their husbands and children) cooked big kettles of peaches, plums, pears, and...

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Recipes We Brought with Us

Frances B. Vick

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pp. 165-168

I received a handwritten journal of recipes from Ross Vick, Jr.’s grandmother, Jennie Claire Hill Vick, which came from her mother, Rosa Bell Ross Hill. Rosa was born in 1862 in Illinois, the daughter of Lewis Ross. Grandma had given the book to me because I seemed the only one in the family interested in...

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The Christmas “Goose”

Peggy A. Redshaw

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pp. 169-174

In the 1960s my father, Chick, worked as a Storekeeper for CIPS, a public utility company in Quincy, Illinois. His cousin, Les, owned Redshaw Freight Line and delivered material to his workplace. It was early December and Christmas was a couple of weeks away. Les called my dad and talked...

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A Bountiful Harvest

Nina Lou Vansickle Marshall Garrett

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pp. 175-180

In February 1938, our family returned to Oklahoma to visit Dad’s younger brother Neal and his family. We had moved from Oklahoma to Chandler, Arizona, in 1934, seeking work for our family of seven. Dad and Mom, along with my two older brothers, had worked hard doing different jobs that would sustain us...

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Is This Your Ambrosia?

Carol Hanson

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pp. 181-188

Greek legend says that Ambrosia is the food of the gods. Of course, we’re not talking about the same food that the Greek legends refer to, nor is this Ambrosia likely to grant immortality to anyone. However, the recipe for Ambrosia has been an old favorite among families in the Southern swath of...

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From the Farm to the Fryer: Food of the State Fair of Texas

Erin Marissa Russell

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pp. 189-194

Guests experience the State Fair of Texas as a panorama of spinning neon lights, jangly carnival melodies, and early fall Texas sunshine. But the most memorable sensory impressions the Fair offers may be the smells and tastes. Patron and one-time Wine Garden employee Sarah Browning described...

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Stories and Recipes from the Cross Timbers and Prairies

Approximately 15 million acres of alternating woodlands and prairies, often called the Western Cross Timbers, constitute this region. Sharp changes in the vegetational cover are associated with different soils and topography, but the grass composition...

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The Penzance Jam Cake

Jane Roberts Wood

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pp. 197-200

Every family has a legendary saint. Our family’s was always Mamie. I never knew her, but I knew all her saintly qualities: I knew that when her family left Penzance, England, she was a little girl and told to pack her baby doll along with its clothes in a shoe box. Mamie never married, but her acts...

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Good and Easy Cooking

Dub Wood

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pp. 201-206

One of the most memorable dining experiences I have ever had was an eleven-course dinner served in three rooms over a four-hour period at the Le Manor aux Quat’ Saisons. The dinner was not only a great gourmet feast, but it was accompanied by very interesting conversation and congenial company, which included my wife Jane, her twin sister Betty Dooley, and three...

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From Eats: A Folk History of Texas Foods

Ernestine Sewell Linck and Joyce Gibson Roach

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pp. 207-212

Pioneers brought with them knowledge of edible plants, fruits, and nuts already learned from Indians back on the Upper South. Lamb’s-quarters, wild lettuce, curly dock, nettle leaves, dandelion greens, sorrel, and poke were picked when the leaves were young and tender and then boiled with...

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His Recipes

James Ward Lee

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pp. 213-218

Here is a word of warning. If you cook by the local church cookbook—and I hope you don’t—you might as well stop now. You won’t find “a can of mushroom soup” or “a ten-ounce package of frozen broccoli” mentioned here. As a matter of fact, you may have to kill a hog. But that is fine...

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From NorseKitchens, Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, Clifton, Texas

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pp. 219-222

The smørgasbord is as old as the Viking Saga. It was the custom of the ruthless, conquering Vikings, their kings and leaders to hold these feasts in elaborately decorated halls. The Scandinavians say “skål,” which literally means skull. It is said that the Vikings drank out of the skulls of their foes. But today “skål ” means be...

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The Fried Chicken Saga

Barbara Pybas

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pp. 223-228

During the depression years of the 1930s there was very little spending money, but our family was quite resourceful and we had plenty of food. During the spring and summer, we had fried chicken every Sunday. There was a running joke about the preacher coming to our house for Sunday dinner. A strutting...

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Folklore and Foodlore Treasury: The Culinary Collection of Texas Woman’s University

Phyllis Bridges

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pp. 229-242

Essential to life is food. Central to folklore are the acquisition, preparation, and rituals of food. Culinary history tells the lore of the people and the community. Folklorists recognize the importance of geography, economy, weather, sociology, psychology, religion, and other folk elements in food availability and choices. Taboos regarding food are also central to understanding...

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Stories and Recipes from the South Texas Plains

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pp. 243-246

South of San Antonio, between the coast and the Rio Grande, are some 21 million acres of subtropical dryland vegetation, consisting of small trees, shrubs, cactus, weeds, and grasses. The area is noteworthy for extensive brushlands and is known as the Brush Country, or the Spanish equivalents of...

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Government Packer Grub

Riley Froh

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pp. 247-254

My father-in-law, William Valentine Binz, was over fifty when his only child Mary Pearl Binz was born on October 29, 1939, so I had an interesting link with the past when Mary and I married in the early 1960s and I gradually got to know Bill Binz. He was seventyone when I met him in October...

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Lion Stew (for the Lion-Hearted)

Robert Flynn

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pp. 255-262

The way to Ewaso Ngiro was so rough I bounced off the seat and bumped my head on the roof of the vehicle. It was so rough my wife said the thing she most regretted not bringing to Africa was a jogging bra. Led by our Kikuyu guide, we were driving into Masai territory, into an area few non-Masai...

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Roadkill Dinners

Jean Flynn

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pp. 263-266

Wild game is a specialty around our house because after hunting season we can’t afford anything else. But cooking the game is a natural for me. Dad was a sharecropper in Northwest Texas, which means he owned nothing put a passel of kids—six of his own and two orphaned nephews. When he could, he brought home rabbit, squirrel, frogs or fish. He had an aversion...

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Passing Along Family Recipes

Mary Margaret Dougherty Campbell

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pp. 267-274

My grandmother Leona Harrod Dougherty Grimsinger, whom everyone called Nonnie, was an excellent cook. I was fortunate to spend time in her kitchen from my earliest years until her death just after my 40th birthday, which was a few months shy of her 93rd birthday, first observing, then...

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Following the Crops

Sam Cavazos

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pp. 275-280

How did this Mexican man and this strawberry blonde, blueeyed Irish girl get together? My parents, Rafael Silva Cavazos and Lenora Josephine Walter—my mom’s mother’s maiden name was O’Toole—met this way, according to my sister. My father was working in a restaurant in the St. Louis area....

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From Petra’s Legacy: The South Texas Ranching Empire of Petra Vela and Mifflin Kenedy

Jane Clements Monday and Frances Brannen Vick

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pp. 281-284

In Brownsville, Petra Vela de Vidal Kenedy planned her family’s meals and she or her servant shopped each day, which was required due to the lack of refrigeration. Early in the morning the marketplace was filled with the aromas of ground coffee beans, fresh vegetables, baked breads, and herbs. Shoppers...

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Stories and Recipes from the Edwards Plateau

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pp. 285-288

These 25 million acres are rolling to mountainous, with woodlands in the eastern part and grassy prairies in the west. There is a good deal of brushy growth in the central and eastern areas. The combination of grasses, weeds...

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The Pepper Trail and Pepper Cookbook

Jean Andrews

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pp. 289-296

Jean Andrews writes a cultural history of a food—peppers, a food she fell in love with years ago. She traveled the pepper trail from Bolivia to the Far East, Tibet to Timbuktu and back, tracking the pungent pod. She tells how and why the American capsicums moved from their prehistoric Bolivian...

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Fudge Receipt

Margaret Anna Cox

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pp. 297-300

On a bright day in May, 1918, Evelyn Murray was born in Eden, Texas. Her parents, Zack and Annie Murray, barely moved into town from the ranch before their daughter’s arrival. They rented the Fred Ede house briefly before buying their own home on the Old Paint Rock Road. Evelyn was always proud to tell everyone that she had been born in the first home...

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“Because It Was Good!!”

Gary and Laura Lavergne

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pp. 301-304

One of the funniest stories we have ever heard about Cajuns and eating was told to us by an aunt of ours from St. Landry Parish. It seems she knew of a man who had to be rushed to Opelousas General Hospital for immediate medical attention, not because of an accident or disease, but for the self-inflicted trauma of having eaten four pounds of boudin in one...

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Dobie, Webb, and Bedichek Dinners, from The Texas Cookbook

Mary Faulk Koock

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pp. 305-312

Mr. J. Frank Dobie, late famous writer and folklorist; Dr. Walter Prescott Webb, noted historian; Dr. Roy Bedichek, writer and naturalist; and Dr. Mody Boatright, professor of English at the University of Texas, would often come to Green Pastures with their wives, who are very talented and distinguished...

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Stories and Recipes from the Rolling Plains

This is a region of approximately 24 million acres of alternating woodlands and prairies. The area is half mesquite woodland and half prairie. Mesquite trees have steadily invaded and increased in the grasslands for many years, despite constant control efforts. Soils range from coarse sands...

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From the Journal of Robert Wilson Booth

George Owens

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pp. 315-318

I spent the winter and spring of 1878 working in a saloon at Rath City, recovering from injuries and privation suffered in an illadvised attempt to hunt for buffalo hides on the staked plains. The “restaurant,” as it was styled by its owner, I. F. Hackney, served to slake the hunters’ thirst for ardent...

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“Grandma in Abilene”—Anticipating Good Eats

Scott Hill Bumgardner

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pp. 319-324

I must say that as a kid I was preoccupied, hyperactive, and a little dumb. I’m not sure I really even knew my “Grandma in Abilene” had a name. My Houston citified grandmother had a name; well, it was hand-picked, “Bamie.” Bamie was picked because of the “Bambi” deer drawings she and I would work on together. But, my countrified “Grandma in Abilene” was...

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Linzertorte

Elmer Kelton

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pp. 325-328

First of all, let me say that I am not a cook. I proved that more than fifty years ago during a couple of summers when I was in high school. My father had a ranch leased west of Crane, Texas, and after school was out he sent me there to watch over it while the regular caretaker took the summer off. My three younger brothers would come to help me, one at a time. It was strictly....

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Vinegar Cobbler

Darlyn Neubauer

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pp. 329-332

Maggie Free was my grandmother, a descendant of a Cherokee mother and an Irish father. I didn’t get to know her, but the family stories tell me she was a very strong-spirited and independent lady. My mother was born on September 13, 1913, and Maggie became a single parent on October 13, 1913, with...

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Stories and Recipes from the High Plains

The High Plains, some 19 million treeless acres, are an extension of the Great Plains to the north. Its level nature and porous soils prevent drainage over wide areas. The relatively light rainfall flows into the numerous shallow “playa” lakes or sinks into the ground...

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Sweet Potato Pie—Minnie Belle Davis’s Recipe

Kenneth W. Davis

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pp. 335-338

Here is a recipe that has been in our family since before I was born. I am eighty-three years old. It was written on tablet paper by my mother. I think it is a memorial reconstruction of my grandmother Laura Jane Perkins’ recipe. If so, it came to Texas in the late 1870s or early 1880s. My grandmother and to a lesser extent my...

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From Through Time and the Valley

John R. Erickson

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pp. 339-342

In an isolated piece of the West, the Canadian River stretched before John Erickson and Bill Ellzey as they began a journey through time and what the locals call “the valley.” They went on horseback, as they might have traveled it a century before. For 140 miles they followed the course of the river...

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Stories and Recipes from the Trans-Pecos Mountains and Basins

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pp. 343-346

With as little as eight inches of annual rainfall, long hot summers, and usually cloudless skies to encourage evaporation, this 18-million-acre area produces only drought-resistant vegetation without irrigation. Grass is usually short and sparse. The principal vegetation consists...

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Healing by Sharing Scalloped Potatoes

Meredith E. Abarca

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pp. 347-352

My brother Hugo and I are not from Texas, but Texas marked our lives. Just a narrow body of water, the Rio Bravo/Rio Grande, separated our home from Laredo, Texas. Escaping the meager conditions in which she had been raising her children, our mother arrived to Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, just three...

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Comida Rica de Pobres: Tasty Poor Folk’s Food

Lucy Fischer-West

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pp. 353-357

My mother had a knack for making a very limited budget go far; we were as poor as the rest of our neighbors in the barrio where I grew up, but I was blessed with parents who loved and nurtured me in countless ways. In my early childhood, my father did construction work two or three days a week, and later had a machinist job at Falstaff Brewery, but he always found...

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Contributors' Vitas

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pp. 358-376

Meredith E. Abarca is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Texas at El Paso. At the undergraduate level she teaches courses in Chicana/o Literature, Mexican-American Folklore, and Women...

Index

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pp. 377-390