Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Foreword

ROGER L E TOURNEAU

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pp. vii-viii

IN THE FALL of 1959 I gave three public lectures on the Almohad movement as part of the Class of 1932 Lectureship at Princeton University. Later, Professor T. Cuyler Young, Chairman of the Department of Oriental Languages at Princeton, asked me to prepare these lectures for publication. This allowed me to develop the subject further and to present it in a more...

Contents

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p. ix

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I. The Birth of a Movement

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pp. 3-47

PROBABLY during the year 1118—the chronology of these events is not very precise1—a Berber from southern Morocco, having left the Near East where he had spent years as a student in close contact with many distinguished scholars and philosophers,...

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II. Building an Empire

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pp. 48-88

IBN TUMART was now dead and finding a replacement for a man with his strong personality was no easy task. It has been established that the decisions about his successor were made by a very few individuals at the time of the announcement of...

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III. Decay and Collapse

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pp. 89-114

CHIEF who would be able to restore it to its previous strength was a prime necessity for this empire that was beginning to falter. Unfortunately the fifth Almohad caliph, Yusuf al-Mustansir, was not a strong or talented leader. He was recognized as a weak sovereign the very day of his father's death at the end...

A Note on Sources and a List of Contemporary Accounts and Historical Studies

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pp. 115-122

Index

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pp. 123-127