Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

PART I. INTRODUCTION AND THEORETICAL BACKGROUND

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Introduction. Culture, Trauma, and PTSD

Byron J. Good and Devon E. Hinton

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pp. 3-49

Since the 1970s, the terms “trauma,” “posttraumatic stress disorder” (or PTSD), and “trauma treatment” have become so much a part of everyday language in the United States that they seem to most Americans to name natural realities. Although the general public could hardly recite the criteria of the most recent American Psychiatric Association’s...

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Chapter 1. The Culturally Sensitive Assessment of Trauma: Eleven Analytic Perspectives, a Typology of Errors, and the Multiplex Models of Distress Generation

Devon E. Hinton and Byron J. Good

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pp. 50-114

In this chapter we present several forms of analysis that can be used to assess trauma and its effects in a culturally sensitive way. These analytic lenses demonstrate cross- cultural variation in DSM-5- defined post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and trauma- related disorder more broadly. The chapter also serves to situate the theoretical contributions of the chapters...

PART II. HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

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Chapter 2. Is PTSD a Transhistoric Phenomenon?

Richard J. McNally

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pp. 117-134

Controversy has haunted the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) ever since its appearance in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) more than thirty years ago (American Psychiatric Association [APA] 1980; Brewin 2003; McNally 2003b). One persistent concern is whether PTSD is a timeless, psychobiological entity, a natural kind discovered by astute clinicians, or whether...

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Chapter 3. What Is “PTSD”? The Heterogeneity Thesis

Allan Young and Naomi Breslau

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pp. 135-154

The diagnostic validity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) presumes that the DSM symptom list represents a disorder that exists independently of the language and technology employed in diagnosis. These symptoms are manifestly ambiguous but derive their distinctiveness and diagnostic utility via their connection to PTSD’s trauma...

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Chapter 4. From Shell Shock to PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury: A Historical Perspective on Responses to Combat Trauma

James K. Boehnlein and Devon E. Hinton

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pp. 155-176

Mr. TR is a twenty- eight- year- old single combat veteran who was wounded by a roadside bomb while driving in a convoy several weeks before the conclusion of his second deployment in Iraq. Several members of his unit riding just ahead of his vehicle were killed, but his vehicle was spared from the direct force of the intense blast. He hit...

PART III. CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

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Chapter 5. Trauma in the Lifeworlds of Adolescents: Hard Luck and Trouble in the Land of Enchantment

Janis H. Jenkins and Bridget M. Haas

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pp. 179-201

In this chapter, we argue that the diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) requires substantial elaboration when applied to adolescents living under conditions of structural violence and cultural conflict. We make this claim on the basis of ethnographic and clinical research data collected for a study of forty- seven adolescents in...

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Chapter 6. Gendered Trauma and Its Effects: Domestic Violence and PTSD in Oaxaca

Whitney L. Duncan

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pp. 202-239

Over the past two decades, the southern Mexican state of Oaxaca has seen dramatic increases in diagnosed mental illness, a spike in the availability of psychiatric and psychological services, and unprecedented demand for mental health care. Whereas in the early 1990s mental health practitioners were rare, now nearly every neighborhood in the state capital, Oaxaca City, has several, their practices ranging...

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Chapter 7. Exploring Pathways of Distress and Mental Disorders: The Case of the Highland Quechua Populations in the Peruvian Andes

Duncan Pedersen and Hanna

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pp. 240-274

In this chapter, we aim at building a trans-disciplinary framework between medicine, psychiatry, and anthropology to investigate how indigenous populations in the Peruvian Andes express their distress and suffering, and assign meaning to their experience. We further explore how troubling and traumatic experiences enter inner life processes and are expressed through narratives of distress, pain...

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Chapter 8. Latinas’ and Latinos’ Risk for PTSD After Trauma Exposure: A Review of Sociocultural Explanations

Carmela Alcántara and Roberto Lewis

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pp. 275-306

According to national epidemiological studies conducted in the United States, the lifetime prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) differs slightly between Latina/os (4.4–7.0 percent), non- Latina/o whites (6.5–7.4 percent), and African Americans (8.6–8.7 percent) (Alegría et al. 2008; Asnaani et al. 2010; Roberts et al. 2010). However, these numerical differences are not always observed and usually not statistically...

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Chapter 9. Karma to Chromosomes: Studying the Biology of PTSD in a World of Culture

Brandon A. Kohrt, Carol M. Worthman, Nawaraj Upadhaya

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pp. 307-333

Four hundred kilometers west of Kathmandu in a rural mountain village, Sushmita spoke to a community health worker. She explained that Maoists had taken over her home during a battle with the Nepal Army. During the firefight, Maoists brought wounded soldiers into her house to tend their injuries. Sushmita stayed locked in her bedroom with her children until Maoists forced their way into the room...

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Chapter 10. Square Pegs and Round Holes: Understanding Historical Trauma in Two Native American Communities

Tom Ball and Theresa D. O’Nell

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pp. 334-358

In many tribes, identifying what it is that is really hurting you is the first step in healing. In this chapter we argue that Historical Trauma (HT) identifi es with better accuracy (than does posttraumatic stress disorder [PTSD] and other nomenclature of the DSM) the root causes under lying the high rates of mental and behavioral pathology in Native American communities and families. We argue further that...

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Chapter 11. Culture, Trauma, and the Social Life of PTSD in Haiti

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pp. 359-386

The massive shock experienced by millions in Haiti and the Haitian diaspora during and aft er the January 12, 2010, earthquake has provoked numerous psychosocial rehabilitation projects in response to this emergency. International medical missions, faith- based, humanitarian relief, and development aid organizations (among others) have inaugurated a variety of trauma treatment programs in Haiti that offer competing...

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Chapter 12. Is PTSD a “Good Enough” Concept for Postconflict Mental Health Care? Reflections on Work in Aceh, Indonesia

Byron J. Good, Mary- Jo DelVecchio Good, and Jesse H.Grayman

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pp. 387-418

In November 2005, eleven months after a devastating tsunami and barely three months aft er the signing of the Helsinki accords, which brought to an end nearly two decades of fighting between the Indonesian military and Gerakan Aceh Merdeka (the Free Aceh Movement or GAM), the International Or ga ni za tion for Migration (IOM) in Indonesia invited us to provide consultation concerning mental health...

List of Contributors

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pp. 419-420

Index

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pp. 421-428