Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

This project has had a long gestation, and consequently we have accumulated many debts along the way. The research presented here has been funded by research grants from the Josiah H. Macy Foundation and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and a National Academy of Education Post-Doctoral Fellowship for Ann Boulis funded by the Lyle M. Spencer Foundation. We are grateful to Dr. June Osborn...

read more

1. Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

Betty Friedan was very proud of her daughter the doctor. Friedan’s 1963 book The Feminine Mystique helped to spark the second wave of the women’s movement during the 1960s, and Friedan went on to help establish the National Organization for Women. Her daughter, Emily, entered Harvard Medical School in 1978, just as the number of young women in medical school classes began its rapid ascent. Encouraging one’s daughter...

read more

2. Feminization of an Evolving Profession

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 15-40

Over the past several decades health policy researchers and social scientists have debated the status and prestige of the medical profession. While there is nearly universal agreement that medicine enjoyed a uniquely privileged place in our society during the 1950s and 1960s, in the 1970s some policymakers and social researchers began to observe and forecast declines in the earnings, autonomy, control, and prestige of physicians...

read more

3. Applying for Change

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 41-64

In Chapter 2 we asked whether a decline in the status of the profession precipitated a decline in men’s interest in medicine, thus paving the way for women’s entry. Despite the many challenges to the profession, physicians remain highly respected and well compensated. There was a drop-off in the number of men’s applications to medical school during the 1970s and 1980s, but this was followed by sharp increases...

read more

4. The Gendered Map of Contemporary Medicine

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 65-85

Thus far our focus has been on women’s entry into the medical profession as a whole. Now we turn to the question of how women are faring once they enter the profession. Substantial gender-based disparities remain within the medical profession. In the following chapters we examine how such differences have changed since women began entering medicine in significant numbers, and what factors are responsible for the...

read more

5. Gender, Sorting, and Tracking

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-112

In the previous chapter we offered a detailed portrait of women’s place in the medical profession. It is clear that women are not distributed equally across all segments of medical work. They continue to cluster disproportionately in the lower tiers of the medical hierarchy. There has been significant absolute growth in the number of women at all levels and in all facets of American medicine. While women’s distribution...

read more

6. Work, Family, Marriage, and Generational Change

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-131

Over the previous chapters we have covered a great many aspects of women’s dramatic entry into medicine and the enduring differences in the practice patterns between male and female physicians. Women doctors continue to be underrepresented in certain specialties and in the upper echelons of the profession, and they earn significantly less than their male counterparts. Now we turn our attention to how gender...

read more

7. Women Physicians Caring for Patients

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 132-152

In this chapter we examine how gender is related to the nature and quality of care provided to patients. As the presence of women in American medicine has grown, researchers have repeatedly speculated about their impact on the practice of medicine. As an article in the New York Times Sunday Magazine once posed the question, “Are Women Better Doctors?” (Klass 1988). Discussions in the medical press and....

read more

8. Medicine as a Family-Friendly Profession?

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-186

Many have suggested that as the presence of women in medicine increases, the prevalence of family-friendly working conditions will also grow. For example, Levinson and Lurie maintain that “women are changing the profession itself. The effects can be seen in the work-family balance” (Levinson and Lurie 2004, 472; see also Croasdale 2002; Croasdale 2004b; and Wardrop 2004). As we saw in chapter 6, women physicians remain unlikely to have...

read more

9. Conclusion: A Prognosis for Gender and Medical Care

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-212

Since 1970 American medicine has been in a state of constant flux. As the overall size of the profession has grown, so too have its complexity, capacity, and diversity. Today’s physicians have a much larger arsenal of treatments, and as a result, they spend more years in training and specialize more than their predecessors. The funding and oversight of medical practice have also changed dramatically over the past generation. Today’s physicians must assume a larger portion of the cost of their education...

Appendix

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 213-228

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 229-234

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 235-260

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 261-266