Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

Meeting and talking to nursing aides over the last ten years has given me a very real appreciation of what it means to care for another person. Watching aides interact with elderly or disabled clients opened my eyes to the stresses associated with care, and also convinced me that caregiving— especially when carried out in the right conditions—can affirm social ties and give lives meaning, whether we are on the giving or receiving end. I am indebted to the paid caregivers who agreed...

read more

Introduction: On the Front Lines of Care

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-23

On a warm spring day in April, I accompanied Christina, a white public health nurse, to the home of an elderly African American man who suffers from heart disease, renal failure, diabetes, and mild dementia. Mr. Jones is a seventy-six-year-old man who lives alone in a subsidized housing complex in a low-income suburb of Central City.1 His only regular visitor is his caregiver Keisha, a young African American woman who is paid to cook, clean, and...

read more

1. The Costs of Caring

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 24-42

Lete came to the United States in 1992 from Sinaloa, Mexico, at the age of twenty-six, to join her sister and aunt living in California. Soon after emigrating, Lete found herself caring for her aunt, who had fallen ill with a terminal form of cancer. In addition to providing care at home, Lete secured a part-time job in a factory at night, assembling computers for $9.50 an hour. Lete eventually earned her GED from a local community college and then enrolled...

read more

2. Doing the Dirty Work: The Physical and Emotional Labor of Home Care

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-84

For the last thirty years, Virginia has been taking care of other people for a wage. A white woman in her early sixties, Virginia is tall and appears very muscular, characteristics that are somewhat at odds with her gentle manner and tone of voice. Her work history includes the care of elderly adults with chronic illness (both in and out of nursing homes), children with autism, developmentally disabled adults, and middle-class children in need of a...

read more

3. The Rewards of Caring

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-136

While attending a series of on-the-job training courses for home care aides, I met Andrew, an aide living and working in Central City, California. Andrew was an eager participant in the training sessions and appeared, at times, to have more firsthand knowledge of the subject matter than the registered nurses leading the courses on “Universal Precautions” and “Personal Care for Your Client.” After I made an announcement during a break about my study...

read more

4. Organizing Home Care

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 137-155

On a late-summer evening in 2003, approximately twenty-five home care aides gathered in a large meeting room of the IHSS main office in Central City, California. The aides, new to IHSS but not necessarily to home care, were there to attend a mandatory orientation session sponsored by the Public Authority for the county. The Public Authority is responsible for processing the wages of nearly ten...

read more

Conclusion: Improving the Conditions of Paid Caregiving

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 156-170

Sooner or later, most of us will confront the limitations of our system of long-term care firsthand, as we face illness or disability in our own lives or the lives of loved ones. For a very few, ample personal resources will mean high-quality care, in the comfort of a home or reputable facility, provided by a team of professional and paraprofessional caregivers. For another subset—the very poor—services will...

Appendix: Methods

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 171-176

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 177-182

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 183-192

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-199