COVER

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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CONTENTS

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p. vii

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FOREWORD

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pp. xiii-xiv

In his highly acclaimed 1976 book New Orleans: The Making of an Urban Landscape, geographer Peirce F. Lewis concluded a short discussion about the Crescent City’s Latin American influence by noting, “In sum, New Orleans found its Latin connection an agreeable one, both profitable and colorful. And in their turn, it is said, Latin...

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ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. xv-xvi

We owe an enormous debt to many New Orleans Hispanics and Latinos, so many of whom welcomed us into their homes and opened up their personal lives in order to share their experiences, opinions, and dreams concerning New Orleans. We hope the publication of this book repays them by widely sharing what they taught us. Specific individuals...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-21

New Orleans, also known as the Crescent City and the Big Easy, has long hidden much of its Hispanic and Latino sides in plain sight. Tourists visiting the French Quarter see the Cabildo, the municipal hall that dates to the period of Spanish colonial rule in the second half of the eighteenth century. History students in Louisiana schools learm...

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1. Isleños

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pp. 22-39

The French founded New Orleans in 1718, but in the wake of the Seven Years’ War of 1754–63, known as the French and Indian War in North America, Spain incorporated Louisiana into its colonial empire and encouraged renewed immigration to secure its new frontier with British North America (fig. 7). The Acadians, who in the nineteenth century...

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2. Cubans

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pp. 40-64

The networks that brought Cubans to New Orleans differ in history and geography from those that brought the Isleños and therefore resulted in a distinct residential geography and different types of impacts on the other side of the city. The earliest such networks date to French rule during the eighteenth century, when Louisianians circumvented...

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3. Hondurans

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pp. 65-94

If sugar blended with geopolitics began to shape the relationship between New Orleans and Cuba in the nineteenth century, bananas began to turn the Crescent City into one of the most notable Honduran communities in the United States in the twentieth century. In 1910, Samuel Zemurray, the New Orleans entrepreneur who became known...

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4. Mexicans

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pp. 95-116

While the eighteenth- and nineteenth-century flows of products, people, and ideas from Mexico to New Orleans resembled those from Cuba, subsequent ones did not. In the eighteenth century, a small contraband trade between colonial Latin America and French New Orleans gave way to a larger, officially sanctioned one when Louisiana became...

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5. Brazilians

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pp. 117-134

The networks that by the nineteenth century linked New Orleans to ports around the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean also extended south of the equator—to Brazil. Rather than bananas and neocolonialism, however, the coffee trade has dominated that connection from the nineteenth century through to the present (fig. 37). While much...

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6. Other Communities

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pp. 135-152

In contrast to the foregoing chapters, each of which focuses on one of the more prominent national-origin communities, this chapter treats a constellation of less conspicuous communities. While none is as populous as the Honduran, Mexican, or Cuban communities, as singular as the Brazilian, or as longstanding as the Isleño, each is of intrinsic...

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Conclusions

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pp. 153-158

As the proportion of hispanics and latinos in the United States has grown, the debate about immigration and national identity has become increasingly polarized between the advocates of purity versus those of hybridity. In , Samuel P. Huntington contends that Hispanics and Latinos...

NOTES

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pp. 159-174

WORKS CITED

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pp. 175-192

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ABOUT THE AUTHORS

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pp. 193-194

James P. Chaney received his PhD from Louisiana State University and now teaches at Middle Tennessee State University in the Global Studies and Cultural Geography Program. His research interests include cultural geography, Latin America, transnational approaches to migration scholarship, the role of place in identity formation...

INDEX

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pp. 195-210