Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Preface

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pp. vi-xiii

I HAVE undertaken a new study of the life of Woodrow Wilson. This volume is the first in a series that I hope eventually will constitute an historical and biographical study of Wilson and his time until his death in 1924. I have attempted in this volume to tell one of the most amazing "success" stories that I know. Although there is an interpretive background chapter, the story begins essentially in 1902, when Woodrow Wilson takes over the presidency of...

Contents

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p. xiv

Illustrations

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p. xvi

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I. The Formative Years

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pp. 1-36

BY something like an historical accident, Thomas Woodrow Wilson was born a Virginian. His father, Joseph Ruggles Wilson, a youthful Ohio printer turned preacher, was the son of a Scotch-Irish immigrant; his mother, Jessie Woodrow, was born in Carlisle, England, daughter of a Presbyterian minister. Woodrow Wilson was proud of his ancestors and his Scottish, Covenanter tradition...

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II. President of Princeton University

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pp. 37-58

THE "richly contemplative years" that Wilson looked forward to with such pleasant anticipation—the years in which he would at last find time to crystallize his thoughts and write a great philosophical treatise on government—would remain a thing of hope rather than of reality. On June 9,1902, he was elected president...

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III. "The Battle of Princeton"

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pp. 59-92

HARDLY had the controversy over the eating clubs subsided than Wilson again found himself the center of an acrimonious controversy, this time over the location and control of the graduate college for which Princeton was preparing to construct a building. Andrew Fleming West, Wilson's chief opponent in the fight, was a Scotsman and was as stubborn and opinionated as Wilson himself....

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IV. Awakening Political Consciousness

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pp. 93-132

IN 1902, even in 1905, Wilson was in certain respects a typical college president; he had been unusually successful and brilliant, it is true, but none the less he was typical of the academic executive who gets on well with trustees and wealthy patrons of his institution. By 1910 he had lost much of his old urbanity. He had been defeated in the quadrangle fight and was about to suffer...

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V. The Great Decision

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pp. 133-172

DURING the first twenty-one years of Woodrow Wilson's residence in New Jersey, from 1890 to 1911, the state experienced a minor political revolution. Control of the state government passed from Democratic hands in 1894-1896, and until 1911 the Republicans enjoyed almost complete political dominance. The election of 1910 marked the end of the Republican cycle, and in...

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VI. The First Campaign

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pp. 173-204

WOODROW WILSON had been launched upon his political career by as strange a combination of persons and circumstances as had ever attended the inauguration of any political career in the annals of American history. His candidacy, boss-engineered and boss-supported, was now full grown and he stood forth as the unchallenged Democratic candidate for the governorship....

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VII. The First Battle

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pp. 205-238

THE climax of the gubernatorial campaign had left Woodrow Wilson in an embarrassing impasse. Many times during the course of the canvass he had asserted his leadership of the Democratic party, but there is a difference between oratory and political control. Wilson had achieved the leadership of the progressive minority of...

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VIII. The New Jersey Legislature of 1911

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pp. 239-276

IT WAS fortunate for Woodrow Wilson that he had virtually won his battle for Martine several weeks before the senatorial election occurred, for during the first half of January 1911, he found himself confronted with the necessity of planning a reform program for the legislature that was to convene on January 10. It was obvious...

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IX. New Jersey Politics, 1911 - 1912

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pp. 277-308

THE great national acclaim that came to Wilson as a consequence of the achievements of the legislature of 1911 made him one of the leading contenders for the presidency and naturally stimulated his political ambitions. Already an organized movement was under way to make him the Democratic presidential nominee...

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X. The Presidential Movement Gets Under Way

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pp. 309-346

IT WAS Woodrow Wilson's great good fortune that he entered upon the national political stage at a time when party politics was being convulsed by the broadening humanitarian crusade of the early 1900's. The agrarian revolt of the 1890's had smashed existing party lines as no other movement had done since the...

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XI. The Campaign Against Wilson

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pp. 347-390

THE rumblings of conservative protest that greeted Wilson's new progressivism in the summer and fall of 1911 were ominous enough, but they were mere spluttering criticisms, scarcely audible, when compared to the aggregation of whispering campaigns, organized misrepresentations, and outright conspiracies to...

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XII. Collapse of the Wilson Movement

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pp. 391-430

"IT BEGINS now to 'look like business.' I like it less than I did before," wrote Woodrow Wilson six days after the inauguration of the Democratic pre-convention campaign at the Jackson Day Dinner.1 His managers, however, were filled with high hopes and optimism on the eve of the epic battle. To all appearances, Wilson...

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XIII. The Baltimore Convention

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pp. 431-466

"WHAT we now look forward to with not a little dread are the possibilities of the next fortnight in politics," Woodrow Wilson wrote to Mary Allen Hulbert on June 17. Two days before, Wilson and his family had moved from Princeton to the Governor's Cottage at Sea Girt, New Jersey. "I was saying at breakfast...

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XIV. Presidential Campaign of 1912

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pp. 467-510

BY THE time the Baltimore convention had adjourned, the actual campaign to make Woodrow Wilson president of the United States was not quite eighteen months old. Its progress from 42 Broadway to Baltimore had been next to miraculous; the energies and money of scores of devoted Wilson supporters had been spent...

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XV. Campaign Climax and Election

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pp. 511-528

WOODROW WILSON had campaigned at length before the summer and fall of 1912, but never before had he experienced the rigors of anything like this presidential campaign. The demands from Democratic leaders that he make speaking tours through their states increased as the months passed from summer into autumn. When a friend insisted that he make a campaign tour through...

Sources and Works Cited

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pp. 529-544

Index

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pp. 545-570