Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Maps

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p. viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xiii

This book is about pronunciamientos and a phenomenon I have chosen to term “mimetic insurrectionism.” It is about an insurrectionary practice that became widespread in Independent Mexico whereby garrisons, initially, but eventually also town councils, state legislatures, and a whole array of political actors, groups, and communities took to petitioning...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvii

In June 2007 I was the recipient of a major Arts and Humanities Research Council research grant amounting to more than £610,000, which funded the three- year project on “The Pronunciamiento in Independent Mexico, 1821– 1876” (2007– 2010). It paid for the salaries of two research fellows and a database developer and covered the cost of two...

Chronology of Main Events and Pronunciamientos, 1821– 1858

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pp. xix-xxx

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1. “Soft” Coups, Occupations, and “Gestures of Rebellion”: The Pronunciamiento, Past and Present Interpretations

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pp. 1-36

On 23 February 1981, at 6:22 in the early evening, Guardia Civil Lieutenant Colonel Antonio Tejero Molina stormed into the Spanish parliament at the head of his paramilitary forces. His men fired several rounds of ammunition over the heads of the assembled politicians while he ordered them to remain still, waved a gun in the air....

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2. The Origins of Mexico’s Mimetic Insurrectionism: The Foundational Pronunciamientos of Cabezas de San Juan and Iguala, 1820– 1821

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pp. 37-75

On 7 April 1954 U.S. President Dwight Eisenhower explained the “domino theory” in an interview in the following terms: “You have a row of dominoes set up, you knock the first one, and what will happen to the last one is the certainty that it will go over very quickly. So you could have a beginning of disintegration that would have.....

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3. The Voice of the Provinces: The Insurrectional Contagion of Mexico’s First Pronunciamientos, 1821– 1831

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pp. 76-131

The consummation of independence, arising as it did from the pronunciamiento cycle that began in Iguala on 24 February 1821, albeit a truly momentous event, did not give way to a new dawn of peace, order, and prosperity. As captured by historian Javier Ocampo, the dreams and aspirations Mexicans treasured on the very day independence...

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4. When the Pronunciamiento Went Viral: The Popularization of the Pronunciamiento, 1832– 1842

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pp. 132-187

One of the critical questions that requires an answer when thinking about the phenomenon of the pronunciamiento in Independent Mexico is the extent to which it involved popular participation. Was the pronunciamiento an exclusively elite- led practice? Was it mainly orchestrated and led by highranking officers and elite actors (i.e., wealthy...

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5. From Forceful Negotiation to Civil War: The Pronunciamientos, Coups d’État, and Revolutions of the Mid- Nineteenth Century, 1843– 1858

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pp. 188-245

Two decades after Mexico achieved its independence from Spain there was a growing and palpable sense of disillusion. In the speech José María Tornel gave on 27 September 1840 in Mexico City’s Alameda Park to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the beginning of Mexico’s struggle for independence, on what turned out to be a blustery...

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Conclusion: Mimetic Insurrectionism, the Pronunciamiento, and Independent Mexico

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pp. 246-256

Following the success of the pronunciamiento of Cabezas de San Juan in Spain of 1 January 1820 and that of Iguala of 24 February 1821, the insurrectionary model of the pronunciamiento went on to be adopted in Mexico by high- ranking officers, civilian politicians, regional and state authorities, town councils, and eventually a whole array of individuals...

Notes

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pp. 257-306

Bibliography

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pp. 307-344

Index

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pp. 345-361