Cover

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Title page, Copyright

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Contents

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List of Illustrations

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p. vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

Writing a book is a long and often arduous journey. From dissertation to manuscript, the writing of Deco Body, Deco City was complicated by long hiatuses due to heavy loads of pre-tenure teaching and service commonplace at a small university...

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Introduction: City, Modernity, Spectacle

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pp. 1-22

During and after the armed phase of the Mexican Revolution (1910– 20), which claimed over one million lives and displaced many more, Mexico City experienced a drastic influx of female migrants. Some hoped to escape the ravages of war...

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1. Performance: A City of Spectacles

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pp. 23-60

Esperanza Iris, the grand dame of Mexican operetta and the theater’s namesake (fig. 1), felt nervous as she looked out over her audience while stagehands made the final preparations. On the night of its inauguration, the elegant theater was filled...

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2. Bataclanismo: From Divas to Deco Bodies

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pp. 61-100

Voilá Paris: La ba-ta-clán, a grand variety spectacle from the French capital, premiered in Teatro Iris in Mexico City on February 12, 1925. Featuring nude and seminude French actresses who performed dances and acts that appeared to be a mix...

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3. Camposcape: Naturalizing Nudity

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pp. 101-136

In the spring of 1925, Santa Anita’s Festival of Flowers seemed to follow its tranquil trend of previous years. The large displays of flowers, the selection of indias bonitas,1 and the boat rides on the Viga Canal all communicated what residents...

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4. Promis-ciudad: Projecting Pornography and Mapping Modernity

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pp. 137-178

In 1934, Vea: Semanario Moderno (Look: The modern weekly) started its tenure as one of Mexico City’s most risqué adult magazines.1 In stories such as such as “La cita” (The date), little was left to the imagination:
I would kiss her mouth; and then, traveling...

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5. Planning the Deco City: Urban Reform

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pp. 179-220

By the early 1930s, visitors entering the new Parque México were greeted by a statue of a robust indigenous woman. Pouring water from two large urns into a small pool of blue water, the woman beckoned passersby away from the hustle...

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6. Mercado Abelardo Rodríguez

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pp. 221-256

On November 24, 1934, just a few days after the Revolution Day celebrations in the city, President Abelardo Rodríguez and president- elect Lázaro Cárdenas joined in a celebration to open a new marketplace on Venezuela Street...

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7. Palacio de Bellas Artes

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pp. 257-292

On May 3, 1934, the Mexico City daily El Universal dedicated its weekly magazine to the imminent inauguration of the Palacio de Bellas Artes (Palace of Fine Arts). Bellas Artes would not open its doors until after the summer, but excitement...

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Conclusion: Deco Bodies, Camposcape,and Recurrence

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pp. 293-304

In August 2003, Mexicana Airways’ magazine, Vuelo, published a story on the plans for renovating Mexico City’s centro histórico. Describing the 500- million- peso project that would refurbish a vast majority of the centro’s streets and buildings...

Notes

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pp. 305-342

Bibliography

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pp. 343-360

Index

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pp. 361-383