Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. v

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Series Editors’ Preface

Ian Brown Thomas, Owen Clancy

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pp. ix-x

When in 2009 the first of the series of Companions to Scottish Literature under our editorship appeared under the aegis of the Edinburgh University Press, we had a vision of the scope and range of the series which extended to nineteen potential volumes, some based on literary periods, some on overarching themes and some on specific authors. As the years passed, ...

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Acknowledgements

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p. xi

The volume editor would like to thank Alasdair Gray for permission to reproduce his portrait of Edwin Morgan on the cover of this book. Thanks also to the Andrew Tannahill Fund for the Furtherance of Scottish Literature at Glasgow University, which helped make this possible. The painting was commissioned...

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A Brief Biography ofEdwin Morgan

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pp. 14-17

Edwin George Morgan was born on 27 April 1920 in Hyndland, in the West End of Glasgow. His father, chief accountant of an iron and steel merchants firm, was, like his mother, reserved and politically conser-vative. Morgan grew up gifted, lonely, intrinsically curious and publicly self-restrained. Moving with his parents to Pollokshields, then Rutherglen, ...

Abbreviations of workby Edwin Morgan

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pp. xvii-xviii

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INTRODUCTION Presence, Process, Prize

Alan Riach

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pp. 1-15

On 27 April 2010, Edwin Morgan was ninety years old. A gathering of people approached him as he arrived in his wheelchair in the Mitchell Library in Glasgow, passing from one conversation to another in small groups, sharing warm words, in an appropriately quiet, festive fashion. The occasion was amicable, without friction or animosity, a collective ...

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CHAPTER ONE The Once and Future Pilot

James McGonigal

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pp. 16-27

The sense of energy that readers respond to in Edwin Morgan’s poetry comes partly from its recurrent imagery of movement across space and time. This was there from the start – in ‘the blaze and maelstrom of God’s wrath’ that opens his first collection, Dies Irae (1952), and in the same volume’s muscular...

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CHAPTER TWO Edwin Morgan’s Scrapbooks

Dorothy McMillan

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pp. 28-39

One afternoon not very long ago I was looking at Edwin Morgan’s Scrapbook number nine.1 At page 1708 my eye caught writing that was familiar to me: it turned out to be on a postcard sent by Charles Salter to his colleague, in the English Literature Department, Edwin Morgan. Here it is:...

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CHAPTER THREE Full Flourish: Major Collections of the 1960s and 1970s

David Kinloch

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pp. 40-58

A tree struck by lightning offers the image of an energised universe standing on its head. As Edwin Morgan writes in ‘Three Trees’, first published in his 1977 collection The New Divan: My roots burrow in rainclouds. I grow down to earth at midnight. I am the negative of a tree. […] Roots up twigs...

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CHAPTER FOUR Edwin Morgan’s Poetry from Scotland

Cairns Craig

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pp. 59-86

The publication of Edwin Morgan’s Sonnets from Scotland in 1984 was to prove as decisive a turning point in his career – and in the public’s perception of him – as had The Second Life in 1968. That earlier volume established Morgan as the ‘international’ Scottish poet – fellowtraveller with the Beats (in poems...

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CHAPTER FIVE Cold War Morgan

Adam Piette

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pp. 87-100

On 4 March 1961 the Scottish CND (SCND) and Direct Action Committee Against Nuclear War (DAC) organised a series of mass protests against the introduction of American nuclear submarines with their Polaris submarine-launched fleet ballistic missiles (FBMs) into Scotland, specifically to the submarine...

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CHAPTER SIX Morgan and the City

Robyn Marsack

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pp. 101-115

Edwin Morgan belonged to Glasgow, then Scotland, and after that, the universe: from Glasgow to Saturn the line was fairly direct. Sitting amidst his peers in Alexander Moffat’s Poets’ Pub painting, Morgan is at a slight angle to the rest and one reason must be the comparative indifference he showed to the...

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CHAPTER SEVEN Edwin Morgan andEuropean Modernism

Ernest Schonfield

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pp. 116-129

Morgan’s Collected Translations (1996) is one of his most substantial achievements. This chapter looks at the trajectory of his translations from, and use of, poets of European modernism, in various forms, in a range of political contexts and languages, and in the continuing dialogue, or open conversation, of Morgan’s poetic practice. Amongst the dozens of poets Morgan has...

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CHAPTER EIGHT Concrete Realities

John Corbett

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pp. 130-144

This chapter traces the influence of the poetry and manifestos of the international avant-garde of the 1950s on Edwin Morgan’s concrete poems of the 1960s. Morgan’s committed experimentalism in this period was shaped in great part by his direct engagement with fellow writers, in particular the de Campos brothers...

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CHAPTER NINE Edwin Morgan’s Theatre

Anne Varty

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pp. 145-158

Months after Edwin Morgan’s death on 19 August 2010 his memory was honoured by two completely different theatre pieces. In November 2010 students at RSAMD performed a version of his hitherto professionally unproduced The Play of Gilgamesh (2005), together with his superbly knowing verse collection ‘Ten...

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CHAPTER TEN Into the Twenty-First Century: From Demon to Dream

Hamish Whyte

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pp. 159-168

Works of Edwin Morgan’s last decade – Demon, Cathures, Love and a Life, Tales from Baron Munchausen and Dreams and Other Nightmares (published or co-published by his Scottish publisher Mariscat Press, some collected in Carcanet Press editions) – can be considered among his most original, surprising and challenging accomplishments. Ranging as they do from prehistory to intimate...

Endnotes

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pp. 169-190

Further Reading

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pp. 191-198

Notes on Contributors

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pp. 199-200

Index

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pp. 201-214

Back Cover

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pp. 215-215