Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Preface

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pp. vii-xi

...responsible both for the earliest articulation of these new concepts and for their careful introduction into indigenous circles. They necessarily became agents of many types of social, economic, and political change. As such, the missionaries exercised, individually and collectively, a powerful influence, both directly and indirectly, over scattered villages and, in..

Contents

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p. xii

Illustrations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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I. The Occupation of Northern Rhodesia

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pp. 3-37

...Britons to concern themselves with the welfare of "darkest Africa." Although he was anticipated in his discoveries by a number of Portuguese entrepreneurs, his example alone opened up Central Africa and made its rapid occupation by missionaries...

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II. The Introduction of Western Ideas: A New Dialogue

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pp. 38-54

...Barotseland was a vast den of sin; examples of African depravity were everywhere. For Francois Coillard, who followed Arnot into Barotseland, the Lozi were, without exception, "utter heathen." They wallowed in an "unfathomable abyss of corruption and degradation, of which...

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III. Christian Authority and Secular Power

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pp. 55-66

...desert of Northern Rhodesia. They constructed large houses and churches, small schools, and primitive hospitals. They planted gardens, devised systems of irrigation, and built aqueducts in order to distribute the water from springs, streams, or wells. To maintain such increasingly elaborate...

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IV. Reinforcements: The Strengthening of Western Influence

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pp. 67-89

...begun to govern effectively—a number of new missionary organizations contributed to the variety of religious choice that was offered to the indigenous population of Northern Rhodesia. Each new missionary body had previously established itself in South Africa, Southern Rhodesia, or Nyasaland...

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V. The Growth of a Secular Initiative

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pp. 90-106

...the secular demands of their African environment. They had given priority to the propagation of the Christian faith. They soon found, however, that they were unable to devote their efforts exclusively to the spreading of the Gospel. Their scattered stations were isolated outposts of the West; Africans looked...

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VI. The Beginnings of an Educational System

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pp. 107-126

...early missionaries had enticed some Africans to school and had at least introduced the notion of a type of Western education into the indigenous social fabric. But they could not always persuade Africans to indulge in the white man's mnemonic exercises. In the period between...

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VII. Social Change and the Encouragement of an Indigenous Church

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pp. 127-143

...early missionaries had enticed some Africans to school and had at least introduced the notion of a type of Western education into the indigenous social fabric. But they could not always persuade Africans to indulge in the white man's mnemonic exercises. In the period between...

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VIII. Epilogue

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pp. 144-148

...an evangelical and educational routine. They could look back to the nineteenth century, however, with some satisfaction. In the once virgin bush, churches and cathedrals stood; Africans crowded mission-run schools and hospitals. Missionaries of many denominations in innumerable ways continued to...

Appendices

I. A Chronological Account

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pp. 151-155

II. The Missionaries as Missionaries

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pp. 156-162

III. Some Missionary Biographical Sketches'

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pp. 163-195

IV. An Essay on the Sources

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pp. 196-207

V. A Select Bibliography of Published Materials

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pp. 208-224

Index

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pp. 225-240

Image Plates

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