Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Preface

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pp. vii-viii

Contents

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p. ix

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Introduction

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pp. 3-6

IN THE PAST, as a careful look at the Bibliography for this study will indicate, Calvin's eucharistic doctrine was studied almost exclusively against the background of the Lutheran and Zwinglian controversies. Such an approach is methodologically justified since the greater...

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I. The Intellectual Pre-History: The Ecclesiological and Eucharistic Flight from Secondary Causality

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pp. 7-39

THERE can be little doubt that Calvin, the French Reformation theologian who was born in Noyon, Picardy in 1509, had studied and knew the scholastics, early and late. He quotes St. Anselm, Peter the Lombard, and Thomas Aquinas. He had been exposed to the theology of Thomas Bradwardine and Gregory of Rimini. As...

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II. The Imperatives of the Ascension in Earthly Image and Heavenly Reality

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pp. 40-104

AFTER THE WORKS of Beckmann and Smits there can hardly be any doubt as to the extent of St. Augustine's influence on Calvin.1 No father is quoted so frequently in the sections of the Institutes treating of the sacraments as is Augustine. Though he did show a preference...

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III. Calvin Accuses Rome

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pp. 105-155

IN 1552 CALVIN was asked by a French congregation in London whether or not it was lawful to pray for the pope. To the dilemma Calvin gave this answer: "I know that we must make a due distinction between the individual and the abominable and accursed seat [of the beast]. But I do think that those who pray specially...

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IV. The Transcendent God as a Sacramental and Ecclesiological Concern: Calvin's Eucharistic Preoccupations, I

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pp. 156-176

THE ROMAN CATHOLIC who approaches the theology of Calvin, comes to it with a distinct disadvantage. If the Catholic is also a scholastic theologian, his difficulties are multiplied. He is accustomed to the precisions of a theology which presupposes highly developed...

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V. Union with Christ as a Sacramental and Ecclesiological Concern: Calvin's Eucharistic Preoccupations, II

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pp. 177-205

AMONG SCHOLARS there is little doubt that union with Christ constitutes one of the centralities,1 an emphasis for which Calvin is in large part indebted to Martin Bucer. Both Calvin's thought and his piety are deeply impregnated with union with Christ, and for this he...

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VI. The Eucharist in Its Christological Context: Calvin's Eucharistic Doctrine, I

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pp. 206-248

THE THEOLOGIAN who stands before the mystery of Christ in his eucharistic presence, or indeed, before any of the Christian mysteries, must come to terms with the certainty that what he is called upon to explain is ultimately beyond explanation, that the mystery, though above reason, is not against it, and that, finally, the...

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VII. The Eucharist in Its Pneumatological Context: Calvin's Eucharistic Doctrine, II

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pp. 249-293

CALVIN held it as axiomatic that "Christ is not to be separated from the Spirit."1· And this is as valid for the Mediator as for the eternal Son.2 However, as Krusche—to whom this section is largely indebted—has pointed out, when the relationship of the Spirit to the eternal Son and the relationship of the Spirit to the Mediator...

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VIII. Open Questions

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pp. 294-362

THE TEACHING of Calvin on the Eucharist has ecumenical interest today. It is not that the ecumenical dialogue should never go beyond the reformation situation—this would be sad for both Protestants and Catholics. Rather it means that some of the fears which motivated Calvin are the fears which motivate many modern Protestants. And...

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Conclusion

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pp. 363-366

IT WAS the goal of Calvin's theological and pastoral endeavor to restore divinity to God. In eucharistic terms this meant that the immediate imperative was not sacramentality but union with Christ. To attain this objective he partially developed and partially inherited a eucharistic personalism and a greatly modified objectivism...

Appendix

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pp. 367-382

Bibliography

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pp. 383-400

Index of Names

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pp. 401-406

Subject Index

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pp. 407-410