Cover

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Front Matter

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pp. ii-v

Contents

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p. vi

Editorial Advisory Board

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p. viii

Contributors

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p. ix

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Introduction

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p. ix

Volume 8 of the Sociolinguistics in Deaf Communities series continues the tradition of the series with a collection of papers ranging in topics from variation in fingerspelling and the outcomes of ASL-English contact to the structure of sign language discourse, turn-taking strategies, and language...

Part 1 Variation

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Variation in ASL Fingerspelling

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pp. 3-23

Students enrolled in American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter preparation programs often comment that male signers and female signers sign “differently.” These students may not be able to articulate the technical differences in production but will make statements such as “Women signers are easier to understand.” The goal of this study is to compare signing by...

Part 2 Language Contact and Bilingualism

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So, Why Do I Call This English?

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pp. 27-50

For the last thirty years, the terms interpreting and transliterating have been used to identify two disciplines common to assessment and education within the broader field of sign language interpreting (Solow 1981; Frishberg 1990). Historically, the various definitions of sign language interpreting have included working between the languages of (spoken) English...

Part 3 Discourse Analysis

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Grounded Blend Maintenance as a Discourse Strategy

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pp. 53-72

This chapter examines ASL discourse involving classifier predicates and constructed action. A remarkable aspect of this discourse is that information previously provided by the hands and other parts of the body continues to be present despite changes in form. Specifically, a classifier predicate may, without detrimental effect to its...

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Turn-Taking Mechanisms and Active Participation in Meetings with Deaf and Hearing Participants in Flanders

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pp. 73-103

If Deaf signers and hearing nonsigners want to attend a joint meeting, communication among them is usually accomplished by means of at least one sign language interpreter.1 In these “mixed” meetings (with Deaf signers and hearing nonsigners), we generally assume that the presence of a sign language interpreter creates equality of both parties...

Part 4 Language Attitudes

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Deaf People in Bilingual Speaking Communities: The Case of Deaf People in Barcelona

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pp. 107-150

Since the 1960s, the concerns of people who are deaf have evolved from being focused on exclusively pathological issues and now have acquired the dimensions that characterize any linguistic community. This transformation has occurred despite certain specific characteristics of deaf communities...

Appendix A

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pp. 151-153

Appendix B

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pp. 154-155

Index

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pp. 157-163