Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-2

Seminars and conversations at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with Oswaldo Estrada, Alicia Rivero, José Manuel Polo de Bernabé, and Pablo Gil Casado set the trajectory and tone of my research on masculinities in contemporary Latin American fiction. I am extremely thankful...

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Introduction: The Body as Capital

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pp. 3-14

In works on issues of gender in Latin American fiction, criticism has tended to largely focus and build up from feminist, and more recently, queer perspectives, where marked genders are examined for their potential to usurp and challenge normative orders that tend to repress many for the benefit...

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Part I. New Historical Masculinities

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pp. 15-17

In a print culture focused on the past, where writers both rising and established have repeatedly followed the strategy of fictionalizing the history of the continent, authors (and critics) have become key instruments in societies’ rewriting of societies. This remembering by means of fiction has continued...

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1. Commoditizing the Male Body in Margarita, está linda la mar

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pp. 18-25

The possibilities of both spatial and temporal displacements within the new historical novel are perfectly evidenced in Sergio Ramírez’s Margarita, está linda la mar. By means of a dual inquiry into the past, Ramírez puts under the microscope the politi cal dictator Anastasio Somoza García and the poet...

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2. Marketing Masculinities in Nadie me verá llorar

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pp. 26-36

Cristina Rivera Garza’s Nadie me verá llorar underlines the substitutive process of inversion as it recounts the life of a woman in the last years of Porfi rio Díaz’s government and the beginning of the Mexican Revolution. The novel is constructed around an oppositional gender voice to the main narrative...

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3. Political Masculinities in La fiesta del Chivo

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pp. 37-44

Keeping with the economic concept of gender, I here direct our attention to Mario Vargas Llosa’s much- studied caudillo novel, which explores the role of masculinity within the authoritarian (semantic, social, political, economic) market of Rafael Trujillo’s Dominican Republic. Published a year...

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4. Queer(ing) Masculinities as the Dictator Falls

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pp. 45-56

In keeping with the matrix that interrelates gender, politics, and economics, Pedro Lemebel reimagines the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet in Chile through a characteristic narrative and authorial style. Tengo miedo torero is not structured around a wayward prodigal son or a traumatized...

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Part II. Lyrical Readings and the Deterritorialization of Masculinities

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pp. 57-60

The new historical novels sampled in the previous section undertake a rewriting of both the dictator figure in Latin America and the male body in a traditional genre that exemplifies the phallic power of men. Though the authors have been internationalized to some extent—through their relationships...

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5. Defining the Literary OST

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pp. 61-68

The use of music in Tengo miedo torero is unsurprising if we take into account that Lemebel is not only an accomplished writer but also a controversial visual artist who experimented with various video and photography art projects, per for mance pieces, and plastic sculptures. Those familiar with...

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6. Lyrical Epistemologies and Masculine Desire

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pp. 69-79

Mayra Montero’s La última noche que pasé contigo is a classic erotic Carib bean text, which inculcates both the notion of geography as being central to the eroticization of its people and cultures and the use of the bolero as a literary intertext, following in the school of other novels, such as...

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7. Homosocial Dynamics and the Spatiality of Seduction

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pp. 80-90

Alfredo Bryce Echenique’s El huerto de mi amada is emblematic of the versatility of a writer often and controversially linked to the commercially viable umbrella term of the Latin American Boom.¹ Focusing on the class struggles in Peru and Latin America as a whole, Bryce Echenique has attempted...

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8. Franz Galich’s Managua, Rock City

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pp. 91-108

From a schematic standpoint—and as traditional Latin American music roots the pages within a national imaginary—the use of music in Bryce Echenique’s El huerto de mi amada creates a topology of masculinities that enables the author to explore further relevant questions of identity and...

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Part III. Novel and Transnational Masculinities

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pp. 109-111

In this section I look at current trends in the writing of masculinities, focusing specifically on works that question the corporality and position of previously structured gendered orders in relation to Latin America. Just as politico-economic systems foster a shift in the telos and how we conceive...

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9. Glocalized Masculinities of the Barrio Alto

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pp. 112-120

Connell’s hypothesis of transnational business masculinity as a pole of hegemony on an increasingly globalized gender stage sets the platform for evaluating contemporary writings of Latin American masculinities on a global spatial and literary scale. This theorized gender expression is “led...

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10. Materializing the Penis

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pp. 121-127

Though the previous chapter suggests that the only viable strategy for challenging masculinities in the neoliberal age must come through rearticulations of the organic body, a separate line of inquiry is posited by writers who aim to renegotiate the extant and literal body to accommodate changing...

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11. Challenging Novel Masculinities

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pp. 128-138

The impact of acknowledging the inescapability of the body resonates in the landscape of Latin American literatures, where the hegemony of machismo and phallocentric positions has greased the wheels of writing in the transnational position. Though Serna does not explicitly challenge transnationality...

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Conclusion: Of Tropes and Men

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pp. 139-156

In addition to cojo masculinity, several other tropes of resistance in contemporary Latin American fiction bear mentioning as indigenous textualities that challenge a neoliberal gender order. The first figure worth citing is that of the journalist, the pen-in-hand urban chronicler who untangles...

Notes

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pp. 157-170

Works Cited

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pp. 171-180

Index

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pp. 181-185