Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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p. vii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xiv

One of the great pleasures of working on a project such as this is to reflect back upon the support of friends and colleagues. I received the most attentive and insightful scholarly direction I could have possibly imagined while writing a doctoral dissertation, with a very different focus from this book, under the direction of an exemplary intellectual model, Dale Kinney of Bryn Mawr College. A proposal to produce a digital reconstruction...

List of Abbreviations

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p. xv

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Introduction: The Late Antique Roman Forum under Restoration

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pp. 1-22

Generous benefactors of late antique Rome sponsored civic monuments and public structures to forge the semblance of a well-run state. Elite Romans of the late empire, seeking to appear to be guardians of Rome’s past, reinstated historic ideals of munificence in the Roman Forum by rebuilding structures more often than they initiated new construction (fig. I.1). Thus, architectural conservation flourished in the late antique Forum, where civic-minded aristocrats experimented with architectural...

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1. Collective Identity and Renewed Time in the Tetrarchic Roman Forum

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pp. 23-46

The Tetrarchs, ruling within a system of multiple emperors who operated in unison, communicated concepts of recurring time in the Roman Forum to promote a highly ordered scheme for reviving governance. The Tetrarchs were supposed to adhere to temporal cycles in which imperial succession followed regular patterns; this regularity staved off the vulnerability of the emperors to haphazard events. In the 290s, the co-rulers Diocletian and Maximian established a supposedly eternal...

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2. Constantine the Restorer

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pp. 47-74

Throughout Constantine’s rel atively long and influential reign, lasting from 306 until 337 CE, changes in the empire had profound consequences for Rome. Constantine set in motion a policy shift favorable to Christianity, instigating dramatic cultural transformations; but the shift in religion did not immediately alter the fourth-century buildings and monuments of Rome’s civic center. Nonetheless...

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3. Statues in the Late Antique Roman Forum

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pp. 75-104

The late antique Roman Forum featured many statues, thanks to acts of senatorial munificence that encouraged viewers to see the topography as consistently updated. These public statues also recommended to viewers that they consider the civic center as if under restoration, since the individual portraits implied that each new installation revised what had stood there before. Many late imperial statues exhibited outdoors featured reused plinths, and many new works were juxtaposed...

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4. Restored Basilicas and Statues on the Move

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pp. 105-124

During late antiquity, two basilicas with porticoes facing the Roman Forum accommodated decorative statues that documented the civic benefits provided by senators for the populace. The aristocrats thereby offered a stark alternative to the imperial messages that dominated the paved central area and the senatorial plaza. The late antique reconstructions of both the Basilica Aemilia and the Basilica Julia, which lined the Roman Forum’s north and south sides respectively, indicate that...

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5. The Contested Eternity of Temples

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pp. 125-140

A Byzantine source from the sixth century recounts Constantine’s relocation of the Palladium, a powerful talisman that had once safeguarded Rome and that was supposedly hauled away from the Temple of Vesta in the Roman Forum and given a new home in Constantinople. John Malalas reports in his Chronicle that the Palladium, the statue of Athena that had purportedly been carried to Italy...

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6. Rome’s Senatorial Complex and the Late Antique Transformation of the Elite

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pp. 141-166

The Senate House (Curia Senatus) symbolized the power of Rome’s aristocracy during late antiquity. The rebuilt Curia, completed around 300 CE, loomed large as the architectural expression of senatorial traditions with ample space to foster cohesion among the members of Rome’s elite (fig. 6.1). Prior to the nineteenth-century rediscovery of the Curia by Rodolfo Lanciani, the Senate House’s...

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Conclusion: Public Space in Late Antiquity

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pp. 167-172

The series of piecemeal interventions that transformed the Roman Forum during the fourth and fifth centuries CE created a coherent environment, even though they were isolated activities. Significant decorative projects produced the sense that the Forum was restored during this time, as installations updated audiences’ perceptions of the past at the civic center. Over these two centuries...

Notes

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pp. 173-206

Bibliography

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pp. 207-220

Index

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pp. 221-228