Cover

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Title page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Chapter 1. Introduction

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pp. 1-10

The performances, translations, illustrations, and photographs in this book document and display the linguistic, cultural, social, literary, and individual imagination and creativity of the oral literature of the Kuna Indians of Panama. They are intended to guide readers into an appreciation of Kuna history, philosophy,,,

Part I. Humorous and Moralistic Stories

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Chapter 2. The One-Eyed Grandmother

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pp. 13-46

Muu ipya kwakkwenalThe One-Eyed Grandmother was told by Pedro Arias in the gathering house of the village of Mulatuppu in Kuna Yala on June 29, 1970, on the occasion of the annual celebration of the creation of the school in the village. On such occasions the Kuna engage in both serious discourse and humorous performances...

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Chapter 3. The One-Eyed Grandmother

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pp. 47-58

This version of The One-Eyed Grandmother was written and then read orally by Hortenciano Martinez on July 8,1970. While many Kuna read and write Spanish, it is only recently that they have been writing in the Kuna language. Hortenciano Martinez, my assistant at the time, had listened to and transcribed Pedro Arias's...

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Chapter 4. The Turtle Story

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pp. 59-70

Chief Nipakkinya of Mulatuppu told yalamoro kwento/ The Turtle Story in April 1970. Nipakkinya was at the time an elderly chief who was respected for his knowledge and performing abilities and also was loved for his exuberant and friendly sense of humor. He was known and loved throughout Kuna Yala for his humorous...

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Chapter 5. The Way of the Turtle

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pp. 71-80

Pedro Arias, then chief's spokesman of Mulatuppu, told yarmoro ikarl The Way of the Turtle (as he called it) on the morning of June 29,1970, in the Mulatuppu gathering house, during the annual celebration of the creation of the village school, an occasion on which he told several stories, including The One-Eyed Grandmother...

Part II. Myths and Magical Chants

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Chapter 6. Counsel to the Way of the Devil Medicine

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pp. 83-90

Nia ikar ina unaelCounsel to the Way of the Devil Medicine was performed by Anselmo Urrutia in a house in Panama City in 1998. Anselmo Urrutia came from a family of political leaders and ritual specialists. His father was a chief and curing specialist and died when Anselmo was very young. Anselmo was taken care of...

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Chapter 7. The Way of Cooling Off

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pp. 91-152

Tampoet ikar/The Way ofCooling Off was performed by Pranki Pilos in his home in Mulatuppu on December 10, 1978. Pranki Pilos was a specialist in medicine, both herbal and therapeutic. He was especially known for his remarkable ability to learn and perform long, memorized chants. Among those he knew were The...

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Chapter 8. The Way of the Rattlesnake

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pp. 153-170

Ukkunaipe ikar/The Way of the Rattlesnake was performed by Olowiktinappi in a home in Mulatuppu on March 13, 1970. The Way of the Rattlesnake is a genre of Kuna literature that is oriented to magical and curing practices. It is a member of a large but endangered set of chants that are addressed to representatives...

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Chapter 9. The Way of Making Chicha

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pp. 171-214

Inna sopet ikar /The Way of Making Chicha was performed by Chief Mastaletat of Mulatuppu on April 27,1970. At the time, Mastaletat was one of the primary chiefs of the village of Mulatuppu. Intelligent and friendly, Chief Mastaletat was very knowledgeable of Kuna tradition. In addition to myths and history, he...

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Chapter 10. The Way of the Sea Turtle

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pp. 215-234

Yaukka ikar/The Way of the Sea Turtle was performed by Tiowilikinya in his home in Mulatuppu in March 1979. Tiowilikinya was a medicinal specialist who could be seen every day carrying on long poles on his shoulders large quantities of medicine he had gathered in the jungle. He was a tall and strong man, strikingly...

Part III. Women's Songs

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Chapter 11. Chicha Song

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pp. 237-246

During puberty festivities, in addition to the ritual cutting of a young girl's hair and the performance of long chants by the master of ceremonies, the kantule, there are various other activities that occur. One of these is the performance of chants and songs, by both men and women, for the pleasure and amusement of a gathered.......

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Chapter 12. Three Kuna Lullabies

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pp. 247-260

The best known form of Kuna visual art is the mola, an applique and reverse applique blouse made, worn, and sold by Kuna women. Kuna women are also verbal artists and perform a variety of Kuna genres, including myths, counsels, curing and magical chants, chicha songs,1 and lullabies. Lullabies are omnipresent in Kuna...

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Chapter 13. Counsel to a Parakeet

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pp. 261-264

This short song, a humorous and pleasant sounding counsel to a parakeet, is akin to lullabies.1 It was performed in 1970 by Justina Pineda Castrellan, the same person who performed the chicha song.2 The Kuna keep parakeets as pets. They catch them in the jungle and keep them in their houses. They...

Notes

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pp. 265-268

References

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pp. 269-270

Index

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pp. 271-272