Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Prologue: Poe

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-10

Why France? readers of Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” may ask.1What led the American tale- teller of gothic suspense to set the first modern detective story in contemporary Paris and to name it, morbidly, for a fictional street in the real Quartier St. Roch?2 As Baudelaire enjoyed pointing out, Poe had never set foot in France when...

read more

Chapter 1. Introduction: Mapping Murder

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 11-36

Through its spatial logics, Poe’s Rue Morgue bequeathed to its generic descendants two irresolvable tensions: between abstract intellection and bodily violence, and between (inter- ) national politics and domestic privacy. The chapters in this book trace those tensions as they have played out in the...

PART I: ARCHAEOLOGIES

read more

Chapter 2. Quarries and Catacombs: Underground Crime in Second Empire Romans-feuilletons

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 39-79

Unlike New York City, which was built on a uniform geological stratum, and unlike London, which has cut relatively little into its base of sedimentary rock, the city of Paris rests precariously on an extensive subterranean network of vaults and shafts that tunnel through a terrain of stratigraphic complexity.1 With over 300 kilometers of underground...

read more

Chapter 3. Skulls and Bones: Paleohistory in Leroux and Leblanc

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 80-117

In the previous chapter on catacomb fictions, we have seen that the chronotop of the urban criminal underground flourished especially during the Second Empire. As modern construction exposed ancient bones under Paris, geological discourse merged with Revolutionary history to inflect narratives of cyclical violence, under and...

read more

Chapter 4. Crypts and Ghosts: Terrains of National Trauma in Japrisot and Vargas

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 118-156

When Léo Malet claimed to have written “archaeological” novels throughout the 1950s and 1960s, he was not referring to a literal transposition of scientific method into the crime genre. We do not find in his work, for example, the geological allegories of Berthet’s Catacombes de Paris or the fictionalized paleontologis...

PART II: INTERSECTIONS

read more

Chapter 5. Street-Name Mysteries and Private/Public Violence, 1867–2001

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-184

The first part of this book analyzes a cluster of “underground” crime fictions, in which violence below the surface threatens order above. And in Part III, maps in crime fiction signal a cartographic impulse at work in the detective’s navigation of urban space. The distinction here between verticality and horizontality, however, is a heuristic one,...

PART III: CARTOGRAPHIES

read more

Chapter 6. Terrains Vagues: Gaboriau and the Birth of the Cartographic Mystery

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 187-207

When Emile Gaboriau extended a Poe- like crime story to novel length in his 1863 L’Aff aire Lerouge, he became the “ father of French detective fiction.” Among the direct imitators of L’Aff aire Lerouge, which frames a long historical flashback within a present- day mystery’s investigation, were Arthur Conan Doyle in England, Anna Katherine...

read more

Chapter 7. Mapping the City: Malet’s Mysteries and Butor’s Bleston

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 208-223

On August 23, 1973, François Le Lionnais founded a spinoff of the experimental Oulipo (Ouvroir de littérature potentielle) dedicated to the detective genre: the Oulipopo (Ouvroir de littérature policière potentielle).1 This collective has published issues of its journal Enigmatika on topics like the Série noire, characters like Arsène Lupin...

read more

Chapter 8. Zéropa-Land: Balkanization and the Schizocartographies of Dantec and Radoman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 224-252

In the past quarter- century, technological acceleration and global networking possibilities have combined with geopolitical instability in the minds of spatial theorists to result in a less- than- sunny “supermodern space”: themes of dystopia and dissolution dominate concepts from Marc Augé’s “non- lieux” to Bruce Bégout’s “Zeropolis” and even...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 253-278

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-292

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 293-296

This book has been a number of years in the making, and along the way I have benefited beyond measure from the generosity of colleagues, friends, family, and institutions. Many of my intellectual guides appear as proper names in the Index and I thank them for having carved out paths to explore. I began work on Legacies of...