Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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Contents

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p. v

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Preface to the Paperback Edition

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pp. vii-ix

In the twenty-five years since the publication of the hardcover edition of this collection, studies of rhetoric and the eighteenth century have changed in ways that brought new perspectives on John Witherspoon. The first professor in the United States to publish his lectures on rhetoric, Witherspoon was also a widely influential practitioner of the art. From his arrival in New Jersey in 1768 until shortly before his death in 1794...

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Preface to the Cloth Edition

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pp. xi-xii

By most accounts, John Witherspoon's Lectures on Eloquence in the first American rhetorical treatise. From his arrival in American in 1768 until shortly before his death in 1794, Witherspoon taught rhetoric and moral philosophy at Princeton, where he served as president.

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Introduction

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pp. 1-56

JOHN WITHERSPOON has been widely recognized as one of the first important teachers of rhetoric and moral philosophy in America. However, Witherspoon's criticism of "those who have given us the history of oratory" is an appropriate comment on much that has been written about him. Too little attention has been paid to the relationship between his teaching and the "progress and effects...

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Ecclesiastical Characteristics or, The Arcana of Church Policy

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pp. 57-102

Worthy Sir, During a great part of the time I spent in composing the following treatise, I was fully resolved to have sent it abroad by itself and not to have dedicated it to any person in the world; and indeed in a confined sense of the word world, you see I have still kept my resolution. The reason of this my intended purpose was that I find the right honorable the earl of Shaftesbury in an advertisement or ticket prefixed to his works hath expressed...

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Address To the Inhabitants of Jamaica, and Other West India Islands, in Behalf of the College of New Jersey

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pp. 103-115

Gentlemen, IT is unneccessary to begin this address by a labored encomium on learning in general, or the importance of public seminaries for the instruction of youth. Their use in every country, their necessity in a new or rising country, and particularly the influence of science in giving a proper direction and full force to industry or enterprise are indeed so manifest that they are either admitted...

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Christian Magnanimity

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pp. 116-125

THE PRESENT state was intended to be, and I think must by every person of reflection be admitted to be, a continual trial of the faith and constancy of a Christian. It is therefore a duty we owe to others in general, but in a special manner the elder to the younger, to give them faithful warning of the temptations and dangers to which they must of necessity be exposed if they mean to walk in the paths of piety and virtue. It hath often occurred to me...

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The Dominion of Providence Over the Passions of Men

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pp. 126-147

THERE IS not a greater evidence either of the reality or the power of religion than a firm belief of God's universal presence and a constant attention to the influence and operation of his providence. It is by this means that the Christian may be said in the emphatical scripture language, "to walk with God, and to endure as seeing him who is invisible." The doctrine of divine providence is very full and complete in the sacred oracles. It extends not only to things...

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Part of a Speech in Congress, upon the Confederation

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pp. 148-151

THE ABSOLUTE necessity of union to the vigor and success of those measures on which we are already entered is felt and confessed by every one of us without exception; so far, indeed, that those who have expressed their fears or suspicions of the existing confederacy proving abortive have yet agreed in saying that there must and shall be a confederacy for the purposes of and till the finishing...

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Lectures on Moral Philosophy

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pp. 152-230

MORAL philosophy is that branch of science which treats of the principles and laws of duty or morals. It is called philosophy, because it is an inquiry into the nature and grounds of moral obligation by reason, as distinct from revelation. Hence arises a question, is it lawful, and is it safe or useful to separate moral philosophy from religion? It will be said it is either the same or different from revealed truth; if the same, unnecessary-if different, false and dangerous. An author of New England, says...

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Lectures on Eloquence

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pp. 231-318

Gentlemen, We are now to enter on the study of eloquence, or as perhaps it ought to be called from the manner in which you will find it treated, composition, taste, and criticism. Eloquence is undoubtedly a very noble art, and when possessed in a high degree has been, I think, in all ages...

Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address--Also in this series

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pp. 319-319

Back Cover

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pp. 320-320