Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Preface

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p. vii

Contents

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p. ix

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Introduction

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pp. xiii-xl

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL WRITINGS of Booker T. Washington are a good beginning toward understanding the life and thought of this black leader. They provide a biographical introduction to an edition of his letters and other writings, and they present him as he wished to be seen by the world, as the American success...

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The Story of My Life and Work

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pp. 1-210

The Story of My Life and Work appeared in three revised editions, in the spring of 1901, the fall of 1901, and 1915. The first revision, after the sale of 25,000 copies, altered the original version in two major respects. It included new material written by T. Thomas Fortune, to fill in blank pages at the end of eight chapters...

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Up from Slavery

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pp. 211-388

THIS VOLUME is the outgrowth of a series of articles, dealing with incidents in my life, which were published consecutively in the Outlook. While they were appearing in that magazine I was constantly surprised at the number of requests which came to me from all parts of the country, asking that the articles be permanently..

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A Letter to the Editors of the Southern Workman

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pp. 389-391

You asked me for something of my life before going to Hampton. This part of my life I know little of. The first recollection I have of myself is, that I was living in a one room log cabin in Franklin County, Virginia, with my mother and sister and older brother, Mr. John H. Washington. As nearly as I can get hold of the facts, I was born in Franklin Co., Virginia, near...

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"Early Life and Struggle for an Education"

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pp. 392-393

I WAS BORN a slave on a plantation in Virginia in 1857 or 1858, I think. My first memory of life is that of a one-room log cabin with a dirt floor and a hole in the center that served as a winter home for sweet potatoes, and wrapped in a few rags on this dirt floor I spent my nights, and clad in a single garment...

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"Christmas Days in Old Viriginia"

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pp. 394-397

IN VIRGINIA, where I was born, Christmas lasts not one day but a week, sometimes longer - at least, that is the way it was in the old slave days. Looking back to those days, when Christmas, for me, was a much more momentous event than it is now, it seems to me that there was a certain charm about that Virginia Christmas time, a peculiar fragrance in the atmosphere, a...

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An Extract from "The Privilege of Service"

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pp. 398-399

I remember that when I came to Hampton [Dr. Washington entered in 1872] there were just three industries for young men. One was farming; the others were carpentry and shoemaking. Aside from my entrance examination, to which I often refer and which consisted in dusting a room, my first industrial lesson was in shucking corn. One of the boys had a shoemaker's bench in the...

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Extracts from The Story of the Negro

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pp. 400-417

There comes a time, I imagine, in the life of every boy and every girl, no matter to what race they belong, when they feel a desire to learn something about their ancestors; to know where and how they lived, what they suffered and what they achieved, how they dressed, what religion they professed and what position they occupied in the larger world about them. The girl who...

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Extracts from >My Larger Education

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pp. 418-458

IT has been my fortune to be associated all my life with a problema hard, perplexing, but important problem. There was a time when I looked upon this fact as a great misfortune. It seemed to me a great hardship that I was born poor, and it seemed an even greater hardship that I should have been born a Negro...

Index

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pp. 459-469