Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

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Foreword

Jim Kamas

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pp. ix-x

In this long-overdue book, Cheryl Beesley has created a comprehensive guide to the use of edible plants to create landscapes that will prove valuable for both the novice and seasoned landscape designer. Exploring the wide range of landscape uses, this reference logically lays out the steps and considerations that need to be contemplated to create an edible landscape that matches...

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Preface

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pp. xi-xii

This book introduces edible plants as a viable option for landscape designers, to bring these plants out of the vegetable garden and into the ornamental landscape. As a gardener and designer, I have always been inspired by the beautiful array of color, texture, and bounty that edible plants have to offer and have never...

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Acknowledments

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pp. xiii-xiv

In many ways, this book has been a labor of love: love of gardening and a desire to share that love with potential gardeners and designers wishing to extend their plant palette and knowledge of landscaping with edible plants in Texas. While the effort that went into this compilation...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-2

Landscaping with Edible Plants in Texas is a design guide for landscaping with edible plants for use by both professional designers and home gardeners who want to use edible plants in their landscapes, including information about growth habits, form, and other desirable...

Part 1

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Site Evaluation

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pp. 5-11

The first step in design is to evaluate the existing site: structures, hardscapes, and plants. Generally, if the property being designed is a residential lot, there is an existing or planned structure or structures that will need to be taken into consideration. Also, the location of the driveway...

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Garden Layout

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pp. 12-15

Once a careful analysis of the site has been done and the existing elements are drawn to scale on a base plan, the design process continues with the addition of the new elements. When considering a vegetable garden, it is easy to think of the traditional row arrangement, which is based on a farming model that lends itself to...

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Fencing and Structural Elements

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pp. 16-18

It is important to consider the types and location of fences and structures during the initial design layout. There are primarily two types of fencing that will relate to the edible urban garden: perimeter fencing to keep out foraging animals (mostly deer, rabbits, and raccoons) and decorative fencing to enhance the garden and create opportunity...

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Soil Preparation

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pp. 19-26

The importance of good soil preparation cannot be overstated. It is unarguably the most important step to ensure the health and productivity of the plants. Organic plant care is based on good soil preparation. Healthy soils produce healthy plants that are more able to withstand diseases and insect infestations. The humus-...

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Fertilization

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pp. 27-28

In addition to healthy soil preparation, a regular feeding program will aid plant health and vigor. The following products are recommended as a part of a regular maintenance program to keep plants producing at their optimal potential. Fertilization: A monthly...

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Irrigation

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pp. 29-30

In the heat of the Texas sun, very few plants will survive without a consistent source of water. Drip irrigation is the best method for watering edible gardens for a number of reasons. The water goes straight into the soil and directly to the plant roots. In spray systems, there is quite a lot of water lost from evaporation and wind...

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Cover Crops and Mulches

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pp. 31-34

Bare soil is an open invitation for weeds and fungal disease in the garden. Planting cover crops and applying mulch can prevent this from happening. Cover Crops Cover crops are living mulches. They are nitrogen fixers and supply nitrogen to the soil while keeping weeds from invading the garden. Cover...

Part II

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Designing with Edible Plants

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pp. 37-42

Merriam Webster defines design as “to plan and make decisions about something that is being built or created: to create the plans, drawings, etc., that show how something will be made.” The action of design is more nebulous and...

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Traditional Gardens

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pp. 43-50

Both the parterre and potager garden design styles reached their height during the Renaissance. In the parterre style the garden beds are divided into geometric patterns, both the beds and the plantings within the beds. The...

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Children's Garden

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pp. 50-55

Children are born explorers, and the natural world is their great magical mystery. Studies in the last decade affirm that children prefer to play in and explore the natural environment rather than constructed environments that do little to fuel their imaginations. The natural environment provides learning experiences not...

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Residential Garden

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pp. 56-59

Residential gardens are unique to the individual property, architectural style, and preferences of the residents. The designer should tailor the layout to suit the needs and desires of those who will be living in, eating from, and tending the garden, while working within the limitations of the site and advancing the strengths...

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Commerical Garden

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pp. 59-62

Restaurants, resorts, and learning centers are all examples of commercial applications for edible landscapes. Edible landscapes provide a unique experience for visitors and the allure of knowing that such care and quality are involved in menu ingredients. Food cultivation and preparation...

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Japanese Garden

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pp. 62-64

While there are no absolute design elements in Japanese garden design, there are certain commonalities that make this design style distinctive. The Japanese garden style was originally borrowed from Chinese gardens and took on a distinctive flair with specific garden elements and styles. Now open for public...

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Pizza Garden

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pp. 64-66

With the resurgence of outdoor kitchens, the outdoor pizza oven has become a popular way to share good food and fun times with friends and family. Gardeners can combine their love of gardening with a theme, such as pizza toppings, to create an even more personal experience...

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Walled Courtyard Garden

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pp. 66-70

Walled courtyards have been an element of garden design throughout history. Often incorporating water features and artwork, these gardens have been spaces for reflection and respite since antiquity. Within the walled garden, there is protection. Offering a place for solitude or gatherings with friends and family, these spaces...

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Low-Input Edible Landscaping

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pp. 71-74

Edible landscape cultivation is inherently more demanding than more traditional ornamental plantings, both in time and materials. In general, edible landscapes require more water than xeric plantings, more nutrients and insect/disease controls than nonedible species, seasonal plant replacement, and a greater time commitment on the part of the gardener. There are two ways to reduce...

Part III

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Trees

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pp. 77-124

There are a few specific things to keep in mind when planting and pruning fruit and nut trees. The following notes and details will be helpful. Refer to the diagrams when planting or pruning the trees discussed in this section. tree planting tips 1. Always call utility locators like DIGTESS to locate utility lines before digging...

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Shrubs

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pp. 125-132

Blueberry plants make wonderful hedges and screens, although they are deciduous. White to pink flowers in the spring and vibrant red foliage in the fall, with clusters of green to pink to blue berries in the summer, make these plants a multiseason design element. They require acidic soil, so most Texas...

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Perennials

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pp. 133-149

During the design phase, it is important to locate perennial plants in well-prepared permanent beds. Along with the edible trees and shrubs, perennial plants will form the framework of the design. Many herbs are perennial as well and should be included in this framework. It is important to remove all weeds and prepare...

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Herbs

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pp. 150-160

As well as spicing up cooking, herbs season and complete a garden’s flavor. The evergreen herbs—bay, rosemary, oregano, marjoram, garden sage, and thyme—can help form the garden’s structure. Brightly colored blossoms of Mexican mint marigold, chives, and bee balm bring interest and pollinators to the garden. The interesting textures of fennel, lemongrass...

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Vegetables

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pp. 161-235

The vegetables included in this section are annuals, and because the members of a family will generally share the same cultivation requirements, they are grouped by family. It is best to avoid planting the same plant or plants in the same family in the same spot for 2 to 3 years. There is a greater...

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Saving Seeds

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pp. 236-238

Saving seeds to replant the following season can be a very rewarding endeavor. There are a few things to keep in mind for successful seed saving. 1. Make sure the variety is open-pollinated rather than hybrid. Hybrid seeds cannot be relied upon to “come true.” That is, the seeds may have the predominant characteristics...

Appendix A

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pp. 239-241

Appendix B

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pp. 242-265

Appendix C

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pp. 266-268

Index

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pp. 269-283