Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

PREFACE

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pp. xi-xviii

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. xix-xx

CHRONOLOGY

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pp. xxi-xxii

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1 The White House

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pp. 1-4

The White House telegram arrived in Dumas Malone’s book-lined office at the Alderman Library on the campus of the University of Virginia. The content was succinct: It is my pleasure to inform you that you have been selected to receive the Medal of Freedom from the president of the United States for your contribution in the field of history and letters. This is the highest civilian honor that the country can bestow on one of its citizens....

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2 Reflections

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pp. 5-10

An old myth holds that the South is populated by eccentric socialites, con men, faded beauty queens, and a Civil War skeleton in every closet. The small college town of Charlottesville, nestled at the foot of Jefferson’s beloved mansion, fulfills this stereotype without caricature or condescension.3 As book-laden students scurried down a brick sidewalk, a cool fall breeze wrinkled the fountain water near Alderman...

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3 The Deep South

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pp. 11-20

Dumas Malone was born eight years before the dawn of the twentieth century, in an age closer to Thomas Jefferson’s than to ours. In 1892 there were only thirty-eight states. An American boy born that year could expect to live to be forty-six, a girl to be forty-eight. The U.S. population was approximately 75 million and the largest city was New York, with a population of 3.4 million. There were no...

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4 A Marine

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pp. 21-30

After graduating from Emory, Malone was uncertain of his future, but his family generally assumed that he would become a teacher or professor. Following his stint at Andrew College, he accepted a job at Randolph-Macon Woman’s College in Lynchburg, Virginia, where he taught biblical literature for a year in 1914. This institution became the first women’s college in the South to have standards...

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5 Brothers

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pp. 31-36

The relationship between Dumas and Kemp Malone, his oldest brother, was not always close, and in fact, in adult years they saw each other infrequently, recalled Dumas’s son, Gifford Malone. Born on March 14, 1889, in Minter, Mississippi, Kemp Malone was three years older than Dumas but died much earlier, in 1971 in Eastport, Maine. Author, editor, educator, and philologist...

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6 Yale

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pp. 37-42

Dumas Malone enrolled in Yale to pursue his PhD in history after his discharge from the Marines in 1919. He could not possibly have known that fifty-two years later, he would be honored with the Yale’s highest award for scholarship, the Wilbur L. Cross Medal, for his “varied career [as] a great humanist, as editor, teacher and scholar. . . . Your scholarship has now made you the instructor of all Americans who would learn of the values and virtues, the failures and successes...

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7 Along the Lawn

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pp. 43-56

Edwin Anderson Alderman’s and Dumas Malone’s lives intersected at the American Historical Association in New Haven, Connecticut, in December 1922. Malone was interviewing for a new position at the University of Virginia. These two southern gentlemen and scholars, although of different generations, charmed each other... When she met Dumas, Elisabeth Gifford was visiting family friends, the Hudnut family, in Charlottesville....

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8 Elisabeth

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pp. 57-66

On October 17, 1925, Dumas Malone’s placid life changed for good. He married the love of his life, Elisabeth Gifford, a born and bred New Englander, to whom he dedicated his writings: “My solicitous wife has kept me going despite the ravages of time. I trust she is not weary in well-doing nor tired of being thanked.” When she met Dumas, Elisabeth...

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9 The Dictionary

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pp. 67-82

It was a glorious night in January 1931. The crisp air announced the arrival of winter in the nation’s capital. The moon glowed against a black sky as Professor Allen Johnson, the editor of the Dictionary of American Biography, strolled home. Against a green light, Johnson entered the intersection of Rhode Island and Connecticut avenues. In the space...

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10 Harvard University Press

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pp. 83-96

Harvard is the oldest institution of higher education in the United States, established in 1636. It was named after the college’s first benefactor, the young minister John Harvard of Charlestown, who upon his death in 1638 left his library and estate to the institution. The university has grown from nine students with a single master to more than twenty thousand degree candidates, including undergraduate...

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11 Columbia

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pp. 97-106

When Little, Brown’s managing editor, Roger Scaife, signed Malone to the most important book contract in either man’s career, the title of the project was A Life of Thomas Jefferson. The contract, signed on June 1, 1938, called for two to four volumes; it was amended to six volumes years later. In his letter to Scaife, Malone outlined five reasons why he was writing the book: “I want to write an extensive...

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12 On Writing and Politics

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pp. 107-118

Malone wrote all, or nearly all, of the first volume of Jefferson and His Time at home. “Mr. Jefferson may have been surprised to find himself translated from the red hills of Albemarle to a Westchester suburb,” Malone quipped. “And it must have been something of a strain on my wife to have me home for lunch much more often than before.”2 Although Malone could compose...

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13 Jefferson, the Virginian

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pp. 119-134

By the time Malone returned to UVA full time in 1959, the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation had already been established. It had purchased Jefferson’s home, Monticello, at a cost of a half million dollars. Fundraising became its major occupation during its early years. Chartered in New York in the early 1920s, the foundation had as its early members largely businessmen. It had no connection with the...

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14 Douglas Southall Freeman

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pp. 135-146

During the last week of January 1962, John Glenn delayed for the third time his attempt to rocket into space to become the nation’s first earth-orbiting human. Bill “Moose” Skowren, the Yankees first baseman, was given a $3,000 raise that elevated his annual salary to $35,000. Franny and Zooey was at the top of the fiction bestseller...

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15 Sally Hemings

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pp. 147-162

In 1974 the national speed limit of fifty-five miles per hour became law, Richard Nixon resigned as president, the “streaking” fad hit the United States, and the Symbionese Liberation Army kidnapped heiress Patty Hearst. Three American singles topped the pop charts: “The Way We Were” by Barbra Streisand, “Seasons in the Sun” by Terry...

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16 Malone vs. CBS

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pp. 163-172

The debate over Jefferson, race, and sex took on renewed vitality in January 1979, when Malone learned of plans by CBS to develop a television miniseries based on Brodie’s 1974 work and a forthcoming book, Sally Hemings: A Novel.3 The author of the novel, Barbara Chase-Riboud, had imagined the alleged affair between...

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17 The Pulitzer Prize

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pp. 173-184

Atelegram from the White House arrived in Dumas Malone’s office on October 4, 1981. It read simply, “The President and Mrs. Reagan request the pleasure of your company at a luncheon in recognition of the National Endowment of the Arts and the National Endowment of the Humanities on Wednesday, October 14, 1981 at 11:45 AM. Entrance southwest gate. Formal invitation follows....

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18 Fame and the Famous

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pp. 185-196

Even before he won the Pulitzer, Malone’s fame grew nationally and internationally, and he corresponded with and met many famous people, including John F. Kennedy, FDR, Harry Truman, Jimmy Carter, Walter Mondale, Felix Frankfurter, Queen Elizabeth II, Arthur Schlesinger Sr. and Jr., Barbara Tuchman, and Senators Huey Long, Harry F. Byrd, and John Warner. In 1957 Senator John F. Kennedy...

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19 Blindness

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pp. 197-206

Aging was not just decay to Dumas Malone. It was growing and persevering to his stated goal. He understood this as he moved more slowly through the years. “You must be tolerant of an old man’s fading memory,” he often warned.3 Robust though he was, he had finished his last volume with the help of a vision machine that enabled him to read by magnifying his text. He was a survivor, “triumphantly...

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20 Death on the Mountain

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pp. 207-212

Earl Warren died of what they said was old age at eighty-three, Malone told Elisabeth. He went on to say, “Walter Lippmann just died of ‘old age’ at 85. I said to my wife, ‘This doesn’t sound good.’” Malone believed that “it is a wonderful thing for an old man when he can be productive.”2 Helen Cripe described the scene...

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AFTERWORD

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pp. 213-220

History is haunted by the preoccupations and crises of the age in which it is written. And so it was with Dumas Malone and Jefferson and His Time. He began his long journey in 1943, during World War II. In the intervening decades, the country experienced McCarthy’s “red baiting,” the Korean War, the Cuban missile crisis, a presidential...

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EPILOGUE

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pp. 221-226

In 2008 author Annette Gordon-Reed published The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family. The book won a National Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize. The narrative explores the lives of Sally Hemings and the other members of the Hemings family in elaborate detail. Yet, it provided little new information about...

APPENDIX A

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pp. 227-240

APPENDIX B

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pp. 241-242

NOTES

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pp. 243-274

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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pp. 275-286

INDEX

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pp. 287-296

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

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pp. 297-298

William G. Hyland Jr. is an author, historian, and professor of law. His previous book, In Defense of Thomas Jefferson (2009), was nominated for the Virginia Literary Award. His publications have also appeared in the law journals of the University of Texas, University...

Image Plates

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pp. 299-306