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International Companion to Lewis Grassic Gibbon

Edited by Scott Lyall

Publication Year: 2015

Lewis Grassic Gibbon (James Leslie Mitchell), the author of the acclaimed trilogy A Scots Quair – Sunset Song, Cloud Howe and Grey Granite – is one of the most important Scottish writers of the early twentieth century. This International Companion provides a thorough overview of Gibbon’s writing. Examining his works within the social, political, and literary developments of his time, this volume demonstrates Gibbon’s continuing relevance both in Scotland and internationally.

Published by: Association for Scottish Literary Studies

Cover

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Title page, Series page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. v

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Series Editors' Preface

Ian Brown

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pp. ix-x

When in 2009 the first of the series of Companions to Scottish Literature under our editorship appeared under the aegis of the Edinburgh University Press, we had a vision of the scope and range of the series which extended to nineteen potential volumes, some based on literary periods, some on overarching themes and some on specific authors. As the years passed, other topics were recognised and added...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xi-xii

The volume editor wishes to thank: the Art Collection at the University of Stirling, Professor Ian Brown, Professor Ian Campbell, Professor Thomas Owen Clancy, Professor Linda Dryden, Dr Scott Hames, Duncan Jones, and the artist Simon Redington for kind permission to use as a cover image his wonderful woodcut...

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A Brief Biography of Lewis Grassic Gibbon

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p. xiii

Lewis Grassic Gibbon is perhaps celebrated most as author of Sunset Song (1932), the first novel of A Scots Quair, his internationally acclaimed trilogy, which also includes Cloud Howe (1933) and Grey Granite (1934). Born James Leslie Mitchell in 1901 into a crofting family in Auchterless, Aberdeenshire, he wrote eleven...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

The film release of the Terence Davies-directed Sunset Song marks perhaps the pinnacle of popular international recognition for Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s 1932 novel.1 In Scotland, Sunset Song has for long been identified as a classic. The novel was adapted for television by BBC Scotland in 1971 and has had several stage revivals, most notably by that in 1993 of the playwright Alastair Cording...

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1. Lewis Grassic Gibbon and Modernism

Morag Shiach

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pp. 9-21

This chapter provides a distinctive critical and historical framework for understanding key linguistic, stylistic and formal elements of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s writing. In doing this it reads him as a Modernist writer.2 It begins by focusing on Gibbon’s novels’ formal and stylistic relations to other Modernist writings, while arguing his distinctive sense of literary and historical purpose inflects his...

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2. Language, Class and Social Power in A Scots Quair

Hanne Tange

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pp. 22-32

Language is undoubtedly one of the principal reasons for the lasting appeal of Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s A Scots Quair (1932–34). In Sunset Song (1932), the author himself describes how his language usage might be compared to that of a Dutchman ‘mould[ing] his German in some fashion to the rhythms and cadence of the kindred...

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3. The Shifting Identities of Mitchell and Gibbon

Carla Sassi

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pp. 33-46

The critical fate of James Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon has been indelibly entwined with the controversial process of canon-formation of Scottish Literature in the twentieth century, especially in relation to the so-called ‘Scottish Literary Renaissance’, a term originally devised by Hugh MacDiarmid to define a vanguard...

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4. A Scots Quair and History

Timothy C. Baker

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pp. 47-59

Late in Grey Granite (1934), one of the Gowans strikers tells Ewan Tavendale that it is a ‘hell of a thing to be History’; as Ewan clarifies, this raises the possibility of being ‘not a student, a historian, a tinkling reformer, but LIVING HISTORY ONESELF, being it, making it, eyes for the eyeless, hands for the maimed!’1 Although critics have alternately argued that the historical elements...

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5. Gibbon's Libertarian Fictional Politics

Uwe Zagratzki

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pp. 60-75

James Leslie Mitchell has gained a national and international reputation as one of Scotland’s outstanding twentieth-century authors under his pen name, Lewis Grassic Gibbon. His immense literary production comprises short stories set in the Middle East and Scotland, scientific fantasies, political novels, essays, city portraits, biographies and book reviews. A Scots Quair, a key text of twentieth...

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6. Lewis Grassic Gibbon and Women

Glenda Norquay

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pp. 76-88

A Scots Quair (1932–34), Lewis Grassic Gibbon’s most famous work, is striking in its engagement with that ‘difference of value’ identified by Virginia Woolf in 1928 as a key issue for women writers.1 The interest in strong female characters, the focus on female friendships as well as malefemale relationships, an attention to the rhythms of women’s lives, the articulation of dangerous questions...

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7. Gibbon, Shelley and Romantic Revolutionary Renewal

Ryan D. Shirey

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pp. 89-104

In February 1935, a group of British writers and Kincardineshire farmers gathered in the snow beneath the Grampian hills at Arbuthnott Churchyard to inter the ashes of James Leslie Mitchell, who had at the time of his death only just begun to receive the critical accolades he aspired to for his work under...

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8. Lewis Grassic Gibbon and Scottish Nationalism

Christopher Silver

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pp. 105-118

The relationship between Lewis Grassic Gibbon and the nascent, fragmented Scottish nationalism of his day was dismissive, hostile and defined largely by the author’s political, intellectual and geographic distance from it.1 On completing Scottish Scene, or The Intelligent Man’s Guide to Albyn (1934), co-authored...

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9. The Battle for Civilisation in Gibbon's Science Fiction

Scott Lyall

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pp. 119-132

The concept and future of civilisation were ideas much discussed in the early decades of the twentieth century, particularly between the two world wars. Civilisation was frequently perceived as being under threat, most acutely so in the 1930s when J. Leslie Mitchell/Lewis Grassic Gibbon was writing.1 This chapter locates Gibbon’s...

Endnotes

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pp. 133-158

Further Reading

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pp. 159-164

Contributors

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pp. 165-166

Index

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pp. 167-178

Back cover

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pp. 179-179


E-ISBN-13: 9781908980168
Print-ISBN-13: 9781908980137

Page Count: 194
Publication Year: 2015

OCLC Number: 925982323
MUSE Marc Record: Download for International Companion to Lewis Grassic Gibbon