Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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Introduction

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pp. xi-xvi

Because it is impossible to understand Jewish-Arab relations in the Land of Israel–Palestine without understanding the events of 1929 (the year TaRPa’’T, according to the Hebrew calendar).
Because in August 1929 the fears and hopes of the Arabs of Palestine collided head-on with the aspirations and...

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Chronological Overview of the Events

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pp. xvii-xx

Sep. 24, 1928: Yom Kippur in the Hebrew year of (5689, or TaRPa’’T, as the Hebrew letters denoting the number are read). Jews erect a divider in front of the Western Wall in Jerusalem, their most sacred prayer site, to separate men and women worshipers as is customary in synagogues. The...

Casualties in the 1929 Riots

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pp. xxi-xxiv

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1. Jaffa And Tel Aviv: Sunday, August 25, 1929

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pp. 1-58

This description appears in the volume on Jaffa and its environs, of the ten- volume work titled Biladuna Filastin (Our land of Palestine) by Mustafa Murad al-Dabbagh (2002). It is not a work of history but rather a geographical encyclopedia, arranged by region. Neither does it offer in-depth analysis. Rather, it...

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2. Jerusalem: Friday, August 23, 1929

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pp. 59-121

So Ghaleb Samrin opens chapter 7 of Qaryati Qalunya (My village Qalunya). The title of the chapter is “The People of Our Village Qalunya and Their Jihad against the English and the Jews before 1948.” Qalunya was located just west of Jerusalem, on the north side of the main road to Jaffa. The Jewish settlement of...

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3. Hebron: Saturday, August 24, 1929

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pp. 122-165

Reports that Arabs had been murdered in Jerusalem reached Hebron on Friday afternoon. Highly exaggerated, the rumors claimed that Jews had killed huge numbers of Muslims. Dozens of Arabs congregated at the Hebron bus station, seeking to ride to Jerusalem to defend their brethren or join the offensive against...

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4. Motiza: Saturday, August 24, 1929

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pp. 166-187

The Arabs of Qalunya beset Motza at the very same time that Hebron’s Arabs attacked that city’s Jews. Ghaleb Samrin, a native of Qalunya who was mentioned in chapter 2, offers a lengthy account of the events of those days in Qaryati Qalunya:
The news of the demonstrations in Jerusalem and the clashes between Jews and the...

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5. Safed: Thursday, August 29, 1929

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pp. 188-206

In Safed, like Hebron and like Motza, Arabs attacked their Jewish neighbors, Jews whom they had often welcomed into their own homes. It happened five days after the massacre in Hebron, when the country had calmed almost completely. On Thursday afternoon, in full view of several Arab policemen and...

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6. After the Storm: A Postmortem

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pp. 207-254

The poem, by Yonatan Ratosh, appeared in the newspaper Ha‘am, edited by Abba Ahimeir, the leader of Brit HaBiryonim, on May 8, 1931. Ratosh wrote it in protest against a sulha conducted by the Arabs of Qalunya and the Jews of Motza. The sulha was arranged with the encouragement of the Zionist Executive...

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Afterword

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pp. 255-260

The 1929 riots pose difficult questions. What caused Arabs in Hebron and Safed and other places in Palestine to murder their Jewish neighbors? What motivated Jews to lynch Arabs in Jerusalem? What triggered the general Arab offensive against Jews that summer? What leads individual human beings to turn against...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 261-262

I want to express my gratitude to many people who, sometimes without their knowledge, contributed to the writing of this book: to friends, colleagues, and lovers of literature who discussed with me ideas over coffee, read chapters of the manuscript, traveled with me to Hebron and other sites, and brought to my...

Bibliography

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pp. 263-272

Index

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pp. 273-288