Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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p. vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

Over a decade ago I presented a paper at one of many Ohio Valley History Conferences. Arthur Morgan formed the basis for my presentation topic, but it was not a memorable conference for that reason. The dinner speaker that first night spoke about a number of Civil War projects he had undertaken and announced his upcoming biographical survey of a famous Confederate officer. As he segued into that...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

On December 14, 1975, senior minister Donald S. Harrington addressed the members of the Community Church of New York City. He began the sermon with a simple question: “Who will history record as having been the greatest American of our age?” After a discussion of what constitutes greatness and how to measure significance, he concluded that, “the greatest of them was a man whose name you may never have heard. He died last month in the...

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1. A Perilous Journey

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pp. 11-38

On August 17, 1900, Arthur Morgan recorded in his diary a turning point in his life. Writing from the high altitudes of Fort Collins, Colorado, the twenty-two year old reflected on his past three years of independence in the Rocky Mountains. He began, “I am going home. [But] I feel that I am going away from home. It is here [in Colorado] that I have become a man.” Morgan continued, “I have...

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2. Finding His World

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pp. 39-70

On March 23, 1913, heavy rain began to fall on the Miami River Valley. Located in the southwestern part of Ohio, centered near the city of Dayton, the Miami River basin absorbed over ten inches of rain during the next four days. As the waters of the Great Miami River rose, affected residents moved vertically, up into the second floor of their homes, then to their attics, and some to their roofs...

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3. Reform in Progress

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pp. 71-98

On a sunny June day in 1919, Arthur Morgan walked down the streets of Dayton, Ohio, on his way to a meeting. Along the way, his friend Arthur Hauck stopped to talk with him. Hauck, a teacher at the Moraine Park School (a school that Morgan helped found), congratulated Morgan for being elected as a college trustee at nearby Antioch College. Surprised to learn this news, Morgan and...

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4. Educating the Community

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pp. 99-134

On Sunday, 17 August 1919, Arthur Morgan penned a rare letter to his mother about his sudden involvement with Antioch College. He wrote, “It is the biggest job outside of [the Miami] Conservancy [District] I ever undertook, and I think it the most important as well.” Recounting the events of the past weeks, Morgan wrote, “I was elected to the board of trustees before I knew they were...

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5. Valley of Visions

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pp. 135-170

On April 6, 1933, Arthur Morgan arrived at the White House to meet with newly inaugurated President Franklin D. Roosevelt. The nation had just begun its first few weeks into what would soon be called the first hundred days of the New Deal. At the same time, the country faced the worst economic depression and unemployment figures in its history. Interestingly enough, Morgan voted...

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6. The Long Road Cut Short

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pp. 171-212

At 2:00 p.m. on March 4, 1936, President Franklin D. Roosevelt pushed a gold telegraph key from his White House office to activate the closure of the lower sluice gates at Norris Dam five hundred miles away. As the final sluice gates fell to impound the waters of the Clinch River, the Knoxville High School band began playing “Stars and Stripes Forever.” That moment signified the opening of TVA’s...

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7. Rediscovering the Utopians

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pp. 213-236

In early November 1933, Arthur Morgan received an unexpected letter from Ferris Greenslet, the director of publishing at the Houghton Mifflin Company. An established author and literary scout, Greenslet discovered such talented writers as Willa Cather. He wrote that “there is widespread, active, and increased demand for a short biography or book about Edward Bellamy and Looking Backward.” Greenslet...

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8. I See a Village

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pp. 237-274

In the spring of 1973, Arthur Morgan arrived at the Andrew Johnson Hotel in Knoxville, Tennessee. At age ninety-five, Morgan’s hearing, eyesight, and mobility had declined, but his interest in TVA had not waned. He had just completed a lengthy book-length study of the early TVA and wanted to see first-hand the reality of his past work. Nearly forty years earlier at the same location, Morgan met with David...

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Conclusion

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pp. 275-290

Over the course of nearly a century, Arthur Morgan recorded a long list of professional accomplishments. His peers and admirers recognized his achievements through numerous awards, honorary degrees, and accolades. Morgan established small communities across the globe, with his contributions to the small town of Yellow Springs, Ohio, as perhaps the most significant. His engineering works and reclamation projects scattered across the country were his most...

Selected Bibliography

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pp. 291-306

Notes

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pp. 307-342

Index

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pp. 343-353