Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Foreword

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pp. xi-xiv

The year 1964 was when the South Vietnamese lost the war, and the year that Bob Rogers and Ted Yates produced Vietnam: It’s a Mad War, about conditions they found in the country. It was one of their best documentaries. Of course, they didn’t know...

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Preface

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pp. xv-xxiv

From one of those branding childhood moments, I remember watching Our Friend the Atom on The Wonderful World of Disney. The screen displayed a vast table-like surface covered with mousetraps, each one set to spring and loaded with two ping-pong balls. To demonstrate a nuclear chain reaction, a scientist tossed...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xxv-xxx

Helen Uete, the administrative assistant for the University of Michigan’s graduate program in communications, seeded this book in the autumn of 1986, when she hailed me in the hallway of the venerable (since-razed) Frieze Building and urged me to apply for a Leo Burnett Scholarship. I proposed a promise-versus...

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Prologue: Égalité

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pp. 1-18

Stuart Schulberg was a natural storyteller, his family’s raconteur.1 “You know Mother,” he wrote to his sister, Sonya, in May 1948, “she never has understood the Army-Government system.” Sonya O’Sullivan loved to receive Stuart’s letters, often ten typed pages or more, brimming with humor and family and professional...

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1. Out of Uniform and IntoTelevision News

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pp. 19-62

In addition to the advent of television, Elvis Presley, Motown, and the space program, baby boomers also share a particular experience as they assemble funeral displays to memorialize the death of a parent. In many cases, the artifacts include snapshots of dads, moms, relatives, or family friends wearing, or with someone in,...

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2. David Brinkley’s Journal

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pp. 63-106

Julian Goodman hailed from Kentucky. Smart, handsome, hardworking, he was en route to the pinnacle of the National Broadcasting Company. He also admirably lived up to his name as a defender of journalism. Born in Glasgow, Kentucky, in 1922, the same year as Stuart Schulberg, Goodman entered Western Kentucky...

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3. Washington Journals

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pp. 107-150

Washington’s African Americans would have jumped at the chance to produce network documentary reports, had they been able to gain entry. Until civil rights advocates commanded America’s attention, though, network news and documentary production teams were comprised of white people. The first African American correspondent...

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4. Vietnam:C’est une Guerre Folle

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pp. 151-192

Ted Yates sent Bob Rogers to South Vietnam weeks before the Tonkin Gulf incident of August 1964 and months before America’s full commitment to war. To avoid red tape and deny Pentagon bureaucrats a propaganda platform, Yates enlisted his brother, Eames, to gain unfettered access in Vietnam. Eames Yates, a retired...

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5. The Mad Face of War

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pp. 193-246

The Vietnam experience transformed Yates and Rogers from merely longform news producers into war correspondents specializing in the documentary form. That professional conversion came with the schizophrenic existence of combat journalism, which involves being drawn to the action while being revolted by its outcomes...

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6. The Battle for Asia

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pp. 247-282

Even before the industry buzz over The Undeclared War, Ted Yates had been gaining recognition as the ace of network documentary news. After such broadcasts as Vietnam: It’s a Mad War in late 1964 and The Journals of Lewis and Clark in early 1965, Paul Gardner wrote in the New York Times: “Gradually emerging from television’s...

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7. “If I Should Fall Behind”

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pp. 283-312

During April and May 1967, across the desert expanses of the Sinai Peninsula and northeast Africa, Middle Eastern countries coiled their armies into offensive and defensive postures, charging the region with tension.1 When a Pan Am flight deposited Bob Rogers in Beirut on March 6, he saw the pressure building firsthand.2 The....

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Epilogue

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pp. 313-324

Bob Rogers’s grief was inexpressible, except in rare moments loosened by alcohol.1 For nearly six years, he and Yates had helped each other through tough scrapes around the world. Each fueled the other’s professional quests. As Yates’s lightness buoyed Rogers, Bob’s gravitas strengthened Ted, and as fellow veterans they spelled each other’s..

Notes

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pp. 325-372

Selected bibliography

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pp. 373-384

Index

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pp. 385-398

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About the Author

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pp. 399-400

Tom Mascaro cofounded the Broadcast Education Association Documentary Division and served as its first chair, 2005–2008. He earned his MA in communication studies at the University of Michigan (1990) and PhD in radio-TV-film at Wayne State University (1994). Dr. Mascaro has taught documentary studies, media...

Image Plates

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pp. 401-416