Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

List of Abbreviations for Primary Sources

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pp. ix-xii

List of Abbreviations for Journals

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvi

I would have wished that the honor due to many people for their good deeds were not to be jeopardized by a single individual who attempts to show his gratitude. Those acquainted with the long story of this book project know well that my debts cannot be repaid with mere words. Nevertheless, I offer here my heartfelt thanks to all who aided me along the way...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-22

It is unlikely that jurors in a modern court would hear a plaintiff introduce a case by airing his personal grievances against the defendant saying, “With your help I will try to retaliate against him both now and for the future.”1 It is equally unlikely that a plaintiff would say, “Everybody was coming to me in private and urging me to try to get back at him for what he had done to us...

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1. The Social Dimensions of Enmity

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pp. 23-54

Seeking redress when we feel wronged is a natural impulse. The principle of reciprocity has permeated human literature and art from the cry of Abel’s blood to the latest revenge movie. The right to revenge is still invoked on a regular basis today, even if it is habitually softened with euphemisms such as “what goes around comes around” or “she’ll get what’s coming to her.” ...

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2. The Rhetoric of Enmity as a Legal Strategy

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pp. 55-93

The courtroom rhetoric of the Attic orators occupies a privileged position in a study of enmity in classical Athens. Our heavy dependence on texts of this type is, however, by no means a hindrance; it is rather a stroke of luck. At the heart of the debate about feuding is the intersection between private vengeance and public power, which is precisely the matter at issue in legal orations...

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3. The Flexibility of the Rhetoric of Enmity

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pp. 94-116

While the goal of the rhetoric of enmity was straightforward, to make the overall argument seem more plausible, the methods by which this goal could be achieved were many and varied. Litigants adapted their presentations of enmity to a variety of different situations, and their consequent rhetorical choices had repercussions on how they presented their arguments...

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4. Enmity under the Law: The Limits to Vengeance

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pp. 117-152

The argument of chapter 1, that Athenians viewed enmity as a socially acceptable relationship that was a pervasive force in the city and was liable to spread like a virus through the web of kinship and friendship groups, invites an examination of the relationship between this feuding behavior and the public ideology of the polis. Athenians were apparently comfortable with the injunction to “harm enemies,” ...

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Conclusion. Personal Enmity and Public Policy

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pp. 153-160

Personal enmity, as a social phenomenon, does not worry us as much today as it worried the ancient Greeks. It is true that we still make enemies and seek to harm them, but the intensely personal culture of honor that undergirds feuding systems of the old style has largely passed away in the West. Cities are too big and social networking too complex for the opinions of neighbors, friends and family, and the community at large, ...

Notes

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pp. 161-216

Words Cited

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pp. 217-230

Index

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pp. 231-238

INDEX LOCORUM

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pp. 239-253